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The Status of the former 2001 nightclub has again changed. See the club’s latest chapter

Old 2001 nightclub to reopen as Status

The old 2001 nightclub in Myrtle Beach opened as Status, with four clubs in one, in October 2018.
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The old 2001 nightclub in Myrtle Beach opened as Status, with four clubs in one, in October 2018.

The reincarnation of 2001 nightclub lasted less than a year.

Status Nightlife, which was the result of more than a year of renovations to the iconic club that had been part of the Myrtle Beach nightlife for nearly 40 years, has closed.

A sign on the front door said the club is now available only for parties and special events.

The building off Lake Arrowhead Road near North Myrtle Beach was promoted last year as the largest nightlife and entertainment venue in South Carolina with four clubs under one roof.

Status featured the top-40 dance club Envy Nightclub, retro dance room Club Rewind, country-themed bar Bourbon Cowboy and frozen drink room Rum Jungle.

Three of the four clubs have the same carpeting/flooring and partial wall decorations with different colors. Envy is gold and black, Rewind is black, blue and silver, and Rum Jungle is green and black. Bourbon Cowboy has a cedar wood look.

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A sign on the Status Nightlife front entrance door states it is open only for special events and parties. Alan Blondin ablondin@thesunnews.com

Managing partner Robert Hills said last year that his partner, Elliott Serral, purchased 2001 in March 2017 and took over a lease on the building that had more than 15 years remaining. Neither owner could be reached for comment.

Hills said everything was redone or replaced in the 22,000-square-foot building, including furniture, carpeting, floors, bar tops, lighting, sound, video, the merchandise area, and four restrooms, which now have wood-like flooring, tiles and granite countertops. Though he didn’t disclose the amount of money spent on renovations and lost while the club was closed, Hills said last year: “It’s ungodly the expenditure we’ve put in here.”

Both Hills and Serral once worked at 2001. Hills was a doorman and bouncer in the 1980s, and 2001 was one of Serral’s stops during his couple of decades as a disc jockey in Myrtle Beach. He was the final DJ at Revolutions before the club closed.

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Alan Blondin covers golf, Coastal Carolina athletics and numerous other sports-related topics that warrant coverage. Well-versed in all things Myrtle Beach, Horry County and the Grand Strand, the Northeastern University journalism school valedictorian has been a sports reporter at The Sun News since 1993, earning eight top-10 Associated Press Sports Editors national writing awards and 18 top-three S.C. Press Association writing awards since 2007.
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