Crime

This is what a woman accused of murdering her grandmother told a doctor about the crime

Jordan Hodge is found competent to stand trial on murder charges

A M.U.S.C. doctor determined that Jordan Hodge is competent to stand trial. Hodge was charged with murder in connection to killing her grandmother and step-grandfather.
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A M.U.S.C. doctor determined that Jordan Hodge is competent to stand trial. Hodge was charged with murder in connection to killing her grandmother and step-grandfather.

Jordan Hodge, who is accused of murdering her grandmother and step-grandfather, told a psychologist that she was present for the shooting.

“She felt kind of coerced or pushed to help after the murder take place,” said Sharesa Christopher, a psychologist with the Medical University of South Carolina who evaluated Hodge.

Police charged Hodge and Kenneth Carlisle with two counts of murder in connection to the killing of 45-year-old William “Chet” Clemons and his 64-year-old wife, Linda McAllister.

McAllister was Hodge’s grandmother and Clemons her step-grandfather.

Clemons and McAllister were reported missing from their Conway home after they were last seen in July 2017. Fourteen days later, their remains were discovered near the Bucksville boat landing in an area where the couple once lived.

Christopher took the witness stand on Friday in Horry County court as lawyers argued various issues ahead of the duo’s September trial.

The psychologist determined Hodge was competent to stand trial and Judge D. Craig Brown agreed with that finding.

Hodge told the doctor she felt forced to help move the victims into a truck, Christopher said. Hodge said she felt she had a “minimal role” in the next steps of the alleged crime.

Hodge’s attorney Ralph Wilson Sr. pressed Christopher on her evaluation. He noted that Hodge said she had hallucinations, but Christopher said Hodge reported those issues occurred at the same time during the day. She added hallucinating happening at the same time of the day is not a sign of a physiological issue, but a substance abuse problem.

Christopher said she believed Hodge had abuse issues with illicit drugs and alcohol.

The state also played video of a couple of Hodge’s statements made to police after her arrest. In one, Hodge initially told a detective that she didn’t know anything about the killing. The detective then told Hodge there was blood “all over” the truck that Carlisle and Hodge used.

Carlisle’s attorney Martin Spratlin also argued for his client’s trial to be separate from Hodge’s proceedings. That was after Wilson said he and Hodge were considering a “battered wife syndrome” defense. Battered woman syndrome is a psychological condition where the victim of long-term abuse doesn’t believe they can leave their attacker. Sometimes issues can present themselves in violent outbursts.

Spratlin said if Hodge can make that case during trial, it would prejudice the jury against his client. Judge Brown said he would rule on whether there would be separate trials at a later date.

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Alex Lang is the True Crime reporter for The Sun News covering the legal system and how crime impacts local residents. He says letting residents know if they are safe is a vital role of a newspaper. Alex has covered crime in Detroit, Iowa, New York City, West Virginia and now Horry County.
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