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Here's a look at the forecast for Fourth of July and why swimming could be risky

Flags are given to beachgoers to line the beach in the annual American Pride March in North Myrtle Beach on Monday, July 4, 2016. Volunteers started marching with flags from the north and south end of the beach around 11 a.m. and met on the beach at Main Street for a brief ceremony which coincided with the Salute From The Shore flyover.
Flags are given to beachgoers to line the beach in the annual American Pride March in North Myrtle Beach on Monday, July 4, 2016. Volunteers started marching with flags from the north and south end of the beach around 11 a.m. and met on the beach at Main Street for a brief ceremony which coincided with the Salute From The Shore flyover.

It's nothing new that it's hot outside.

But the National Weather Service is warning about the risk of rip currents as we head into the Fourth of July celebrations.

Rip currents in the Myrtle Beach area will increase from low chances on Monday to moderate on Wednesday and Thursday, according to the National Weather Service in Wilmington. It's possible a high rip current risk could be needed midweek, the NWS reports.

Here are some tips about spotting rip currents and beach safety.

Chances of afternoon thunderstorms and showers also increase midweek, but the NWS said severe weather is not expected during the week.

Independence Day showers are likely after 7 a.m., and NWS reports the day will be mostly cloudy with a high of about 86 degrees.

This week's high temperatures are predicted to be between 86 and 89, with lows in the high 70s. Temperatures will decrease for the middle of the week, the NWS reported.

Rip currents are powerful, narrow channels of fast-moving water and can be deadly if you don't know what to do. This video from NOAA Ocean Today shows you how to survive if you are caught in one off the coast.

Hannah Strong: 843-444-1765, @HannahLStrong

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