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Ingram Dunes preservation movement gets help from County Council. Will it be enough?

NMB residents hope to protect Ingram Dunes

Calling Ingram Dunes a 'magical place,' Damien Triouleyre with the Preserve Ingram Dunes group, hopes to find a way to protect the private 9.3 acre property from a proposed 31 home housing development.
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Calling Ingram Dunes a 'magical place,' Damien Triouleyre with the Preserve Ingram Dunes group, hopes to find a way to protect the private 9.3 acre property from a proposed 31 home housing development.

As plans for development on the Ingram Dunes site in North Myrtle Beach continue, a member of the Horry County Council is looking to help the city purchase the area.

Councilman Harold Worley, who previously served on the North Myrtle Beach town council, will be giving $10,000 toward the park's purchase. The money is coming from a discretionary fund afforded to council members each year. The council’s Administration Committee approved the donation at its last meeting.

“(The Dunes) have not been disrupted in millions of years,” he said. “It is a beautiful park that needs to be preserved for future generations.”

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Ingram Dunes, a stretch of historic coastline dunes in North Myrtle Beach, will be the topic of conversation this week as two different agencies discuss permits for a proposed housing development on the 9.3 acre site. Developers hope to place 31 single family homes on the property. The property off 10th Avenue South and Hillside Drive has been used by locals as a walking path through oak trees and over sand dunes. A group called "Preserve Ingram Dunes," hopes to find alternatives to the development. April 2, 2018. Jason Lee jlee@thesunnewsc

The Dunes are located around Hillside Drive in North Myrtle Beach. The area could potentially be turned into a housing development, if the city does not purchase the property soon.

Council members are given around $20,000 each year to help fund community projects that the members believe to be important. Worley said he usually save his money and allows it to rollover to the next year, but believes acquiring the Dunes to be important enough of a cause to spend some of his funding this year.

Even with the $10,000 from the council, more money will be needed to purchase the park.

An advocacy group dedicated to saving the dunes created a GoFundMe page to help. Currently the online campaign has raised over $3,000 of the $10,000 goal in two months .

The advocacy group claims on it website that the area is “almost the last contiguous stretch of undeveloped seaside forest, that is not a wetlands.” The group would like to see the park turned into a wildlife refuge or a low-impact city park according to the website.

Worley believes that many in the community of North Myrtle Beach agree that these Dunes would be a nice addition to the city parks system. He said that the park an be used by towns people and tourist for recreation.

The councilman invited Council Chair Mark Lazarus to deliver the check to North Myrtle Beach with him early next week, although Lazarus will not be giving money from his funds.

"I would like the city, county and the state to do any thing they can to save this area," Worley saud.

If North Myrtle Beach is unable to purchase the park, Worley said he will give the money to North Myrtle Beach Parks and Recreation. He hopes then the money can be used for beach maintenance.

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