Football

We've empathized enough. It's time for Colin Kaepernick to get out of his own way

The Seattle Seahawks reportedly postponed - or possibly canceled - a meeting with Colin Kaepernick because he declined to answer whether he'll give up kneeling during the national anthem should he get back in the league.
The Seattle Seahawks reportedly postponed - or possibly canceled - a meeting with Colin Kaepernick because he declined to answer whether he'll give up kneeling during the national anthem should he get back in the league. The Associated Press

Hey, remember those times when I wrote about how I supported Colin Kaepernick?

Yeah, those were fun times. In case you don't remember, this is how it went: I wrote about how I supported Kaepernick for standing up for something he believed in and enacting his rights to do so. Then, most of you would send me hate mail or write letters to the editor disagreeing with me.

Oh, the good ole days.

Unfortunately, all good things come to an end.

As much as this might hurt all of us, I'm afraid we're probably on the same page now.

I'm out. I'm done. I can't do it anymore.

While I supported his right to bring awareness to racial injustice and race-based police brutality via kneeling during the national anthem more than a season ago, it's time to let it go - at least on the football field, where many assume Kaepernick wants to return.

The Seattle Seahawks reportedly postponed - or possibly canceled - a meeting with Kaepernick because he declined to answer whether he'll give up kneeling during the national anthem should he get back in the league. He reportedly also has a deal with adidas waiting on him should he sign with an NFL team.

It's time, Kap. If you truly want to play in the NFL again, give it up. You can support whatever causes you wish off the field and still be a leader in fighting the good fight. But I don't know anyone who wants to go through Kneel-gate again in 2018.

I supported it once, and that's because it was timely and doing it while in the workplace was the best way to draw more attention to the issue. However, we don't need it to be a traveling circus every week.

Even those who empathized or supported his stance have to be exhausted over the movement. I know I am now. It overshadowed the league for too long.

I'm not saying the owners are right in this matter. I'm just saying enough is enough. Kap has made an extremely important point with his actions. Now, I'd rather see the guy play football again.

He once was a very exciting player who showed lots of promise and, let's face it, the NFL isn't exactly loaded with solid quarterbacks these days.

Now, it appears, the only thing standing in his way is himself.

If Kaepernick agrees not to kneel - heck, why not just stay in the locker room until after the national anthem? - his message will still linger. You think television broadcasts or highlights shows will avoid the Kaepernick story?

Fat chance.

So now, winning the fight for him would be to get back in the league and stop kneeling. He can go about his business as a player and let his past actions do the work for him. He doesn't need to act on the field anymore.

For the rest of us, there's two ways we could win. One option is that no one ever signs him, which would be a bummer but also would at least let the league get back to business. The second option would be that he returns to the league and sets all his focus to the field while letting most people eventually drop the grudge as well.

People have short memories with such things.

Nonetheless, it's important not to forget what his stance was for, but there's also a time to move on.

Kaepernick will continue to be a champion of racial equality regardless of how conducts himself on the field, should he get another chance.

However, a man who once made it to the Super Bowl will never be a champion on the gridiron unless he's willing to give a little.

Progress is rarely made when one side gets everything it wants. And progress doesn't happen overnight.

It's time to forgive but not forget - on all sides.

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