A Different World

What will decisions made about Iraq today mean for Memorial Days to come?

LS1 John Miller salutes the casket of Navy veteran Reuben Hoskin at a recent funeral in Charlotte. Charlotte's Naval Operational Support Center or NOSC base is the home for the naval Funeral Honors detail. They help conduct hundreds of funerals every year and LS1 John Miller has been involved in about 600 ceremonies. On Friday October 3, 2014 they'll play taps and present the flag to Lula Hoskin, the wife of Naval veteran Reuben Hoskin.
LS1 John Miller salutes the casket of Navy veteran Reuben Hoskin at a recent funeral in Charlotte. Charlotte's Naval Operational Support Center or NOSC base is the home for the naval Funeral Honors detail. They help conduct hundreds of funerals every year and LS1 John Miller has been involved in about 600 ceremonies. On Friday October 3, 2014 they'll play taps and present the flag to Lula Hoskin, the wife of Naval veteran Reuben Hoskin. jsimmons@charlotteobserver.com

On this day every year, we are to reflect on what we’ve done and who sacrificed and how much and why. That’s as it should be.

But we shouldn’t forget that the decisions we make today will impact our tomorrows. Or, more specifically, it will affect the families of the 1 percent of Americans who are likely to ever see any real combat.

While listening to politicians and others wax poetic about the need to “take the fight” to ISIL and other such groups, or sending grounds troops back into Iraq and maybe Syria, don’t forget war’s real costs - something those folks seem to leave out or gloss over as they their mouths sign checks the sacrifice of others will have to cash.

Remember those who have fallen. And remember why it’s important to question any decision that will assure more will.

Watch: “60 Minutes” presents “War stories”

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