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With 2 storms brewing in the Atlantic, what could that mean for Carolina beachgoers?

Here’s what Atlantic hurricanes will be named this season

The 2018 Atlantic hurricane season is predicted to be another "above average" season. Here's what Colorado State University is predicting — and what this year's hurricanes will be named.
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The 2018 Atlantic hurricane season is predicted to be another "above average" season. Here's what Colorado State University is predicting — and what this year's hurricanes will be named.

In less than a day, Tropical Storm Beryl was upgraded to the first hurricane of the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season and another system brewing near the Carolinas has a high chance of tropical development.

So, what could that bring to the North and South Carolina coasts?

"Beryl is expected to move westward and eventually it's going to run into wind shear and start to weaken as it reaches the Antilles," said Dave Loewenthal, forecaster with the National Weather Service in Wilmington, N.C. "We're not expecting anything from Beryl right now."

Capture.JPG
Screen grab from National Hurricane Center

As far as the low-pressure system offshore, it has a 70-percent chance of cyclone development over the next two days, increasing the likelihood of showers and thunderstorms, according to a Friday morning National Hurricane Center weather outlook.

NWS forecasters said the system located about 350 miles off the Carolina coast is becoming better organized and could be declared a tropical depression late Friday, but the Carolinas will probably not feel any impacts over the weekend.

"It's expected to just sit off the coast and we may have an increased rip current threat due to the system and we may get some moisture from it in a few days. Again, it's a little uncertain at this time, so we'll just have to keep an eye on it," Loewenthal explained.

The first named storm of the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season has officially formed over the northwestern Caribbean Sea. The National Hurricane Center upgraded the tropical disturbance to Subtropical Storm Alberto around 10:00 a.m. Friday, May 25.

But Loewenthal added it's hard to tell what the exact impacts on the Carolinas will be, as the storm continues to form.

"Right now it's in its infancy and it's still forming and it's not going anywhere for the next couple of days, so it's gonna sit off the coast and we're just gonna have to watch and see if it intensifies or not," he said.

Beryl, a Category 1 hurricane, is the second named storm of this year's Atlantic hurricane season. Tropical Storm Alberto was the season's first, which developed in late May.

Michaela Broyles: 843-626-0281, @MichaelaBroyles

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