Weather News

Swift-moving water, high tide create dangerous conditions in Georgetown County

Front Street in Georgetown begins to flood amid Hurricane Dorian

Heavy rains from Hurricane Dorian began flooding Front Street in downtown Georgetown, S.C., in the afternoon of Sept. 5, 2019, causing the road to be impassible and blocked off.
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Heavy rains from Hurricane Dorian began flooding Front Street in downtown Georgetown, S.C., in the afternoon of Sept. 5, 2019, causing the road to be impassible and blocked off.

At high tide shortly before 3:30 p.m. Thursday in Georgetown, waters rose to almost the boardwalk, with no signs of stopping. Sidewalks and alleyways near Front Street had swift-moving and quickly rising floodwaters.

Potentially life-threatening flash flooding was predicated as Hurricane Dorian moved into the area.

John Bentley, owner of Capt’n Rod’s Low Country Tours, navigated high waters after a friend let him know something was loose and flapping on his boat.

“It’s my livelihood,” he said, by way of explanation for his venture outside. He also decided to stay for a beer at Buzz’s Roost, one of the only remaining open establishments Thursday afternoon, despite having lost power earlier in the day.

Georgetown County Fire and EMS suspended services for the entire county around 2 p.m. because of dangerous weather and wind conditions.

Those with an emergency can still call 911 and will be added to a wait list. Once it is safe, emergency services will resume and rescuers will prioritize calls, according to county officials.

“Now is the time to hunker down,” Georgetown County Public Information Officer Jackie Broach-Akers said, cautioning residents not to be out taking pictures of the storm.

Drivers should never move road barriers or drive through high water, she said.

“That can definitely be a deadly decision,” Broach-Akers said.

By mid-afternoon several roads in Georgetown were impassable by water levels or traffic barriers. Branches and debris began littering roadways.

At 12:30, there were more than 60 people at a shelter at Pleasant Hill Elementary, 127 Schoolhouse Drive, in Hemingway.

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Alex Lang is the True Crime reporter for The Sun News covering the legal system and how crime impacts local residents. He says letting residents know if they are safe is a vital role of a newspaper. Alex has covered crime in Detroit, Iowa, New York City, West Virginia and now Horry County.
Lauren Lindstrom is a reporter for the Charlotte Observer covering affordable housing issues. She previously covered health for The Blade in Toledo, Ohio, where she wrote about topics including the state’s opioid crisis and childhood lead poisoning. Lauren is a Wisconsin native, a Northwestern University graduate and a 2019 Report for America corps member.
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