Issac Bailey

Not all Christians agree with Kentucky’s Kim Davis

This Thursday, Aug. 3, 2015 photo made available by the Carter County Detention Center shows Kim Davis. The Rowan County, Ky. clerk went to jail Thursday for refusing to issue marriage licenses to gay couples, but five of her deputies agreed to comply with the law, ending a two-month standoff.
This Thursday, Aug. 3, 2015 photo made available by the Carter County Detention Center shows Kim Davis. The Rowan County, Ky. clerk went to jail Thursday for refusing to issue marriage licenses to gay couples, but five of her deputies agreed to comply with the law, ending a two-month standoff. Carter County Detention Center via AP

Kim Davis, a county clerk in Kentucky, is a hero come martyr in the minds of some now that she’s been jailed over her refusal to issue marriage licenses. She believes homosexuality is a sin and that marriage can only be between a man and a woman.

Never mind her four marriages.

Never mind that her stance is one that tries to uphold a state of inequality.

Never mind that she wouldn’t accept religious accommodations that would have allowed her to defer to another clerk so she wouldn’t have to participate in something she believes is ungodly. She didn’t want anyone in her office to issue the licenses either.

Mike Huckabee, one of 17 people running to become the GOP nominee for president, thinks Davis’s stance is to be admired and her jailing feared.

“Having Kim Davis in federal custody removes all doubt of the criminalization of Christianity in our country. We must defend religious liberty and never surrender to judicial tyranny,” Huckabee said in a statement. “Five unelected Supreme Court lawyers did not and cannot make law. They can only make rulings. The Supreme Court is not the Supreme branch and it's certainly not the Supreme Being.”

“I am proud of Kim for standing strong for her beliefs. Who will be next? Pastors? Photographers? Caterers? Florists? This is a reckless, appalling, out-of-control decision that undermines the Constitution of the United States and our fundamental right to religious liberty.”

Let me say this politely. That’s horse manure.

What it does is leave no doubt that there will be consequences when an official elected to public office tries to single-handedly keep a group of residents mired in second-class citizenship.

It means that a person can’t be rewarded for an adult temper tantrum because she didn’t get her way.

Before being jailed, Davis said she was willing to face her judgment - from the government - and asked if the gay couple she was discriminating against were willing to face theirs - judgment from above.

Her authority came from a higher power, God, she said.

Her defenders claim that hers is the true Christian position and that it must be honored above all else.

They believe it is a sin and the latest sign that the U.S. is quickly headed going to Hell in a hand basket.

They believe it is a violation of Davis’s First Amendment rights.

They are wrong.

And they don’t have the market cornered on morality. There are millions of Christians who don’t feel the way Davis does, and millions of others who might sympathize with her personal principles but still believe her attempt to upend the law was rightly punished.

Extreme conservative Christians are not the country’s only people of faith, no matter how much many of them suggest otherwise.

Their views should not supersede those of others who also believe in God, and why a belief in a deity should not supersede U.S. law.

Davis - like the rest of us - has the right to believe as she pleases.

She has a right to deny gay couples entrance into her home and even her church.

She can preach fire and brimstone and call them sodomites.

She can condemn them to Hell while excusing her own sins.

But let’s be clear. She is not being heroic; she’s trying to force this country to hold onto an ugly past.

Others throughout our history have practiced civil disobedience to make the U.S. more equal for more Americans.

Davis is trying to do just the opposite.

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