Education

CCU’s DeCenzo awarded more money to promote, publicize school

Coastal Carolina University President David DeCenzo has a little more money in his pocket to promote the college’s programs, fundraisers and athletics. The university’s board of trustees increased his discretionary fund by $30,000 to $270,000.
Coastal Carolina University President David DeCenzo has a little more money in his pocket to promote the college’s programs, fundraisers and athletics. The university’s board of trustees increased his discretionary fund by $30,000 to $270,000. The Sun News file photo

Coastal Carolina University President David DeCenzo has a little more money in his pocket to promote the college’s programs, fundraisers and athletics.

The university’s board of trustees added $30,000 to his discretionary fund, which will now total $270,000 for the next budget year. The board unanimously approved the increase at its general session Friday.

The money stems from auxiliary expenses such as food and transportation services, and does not come out of student tuition, according to Stacie Bowie, chief financial officer.

$270,000 New total amount in DeCenzo’s annual discretionary fund

“If you want to have a successful campaign you have to invest in it, and [DeCenzo] is the primary engine behind that program,” said board member George Mullen.

DeCenzo usually uses between 80 to 90 percent of the funds every year, and his staff “keeps a close watch” on the budget to make sure it’s never exceeded, he said.

Some of the money is used to fly in guest speakers, entertain donors or host fundraising golf tournaments. Other times, the funds are used to send flowers and other remembrance items to families of deceased faculty, staff and students.

Mullen, board member, suggested increasing the fund another $30,000 because the money is used to promote the university. The board eventually decided against it – because the education foundation also chips in promotional funds – but DeCenzo said he could always use a little more.

“We are trying to keep it at a reasonable rate,” he said.

The new total will take effect July 1.

This is all discretionary money, it has nothing to do with tuition dollars, so the monies are available.

David DeCenzo, CCU president

Chuck Lewis, board member, said the funds are necessary because of CCU’s explosive growth over the years. A university of 10,000 students isn’t necessarily on everyone’s radar – especially potential donors – so DeCenzo’s work is important to improving all aspects of the college.

Even donors who want to contribute need a little help getting to the university, which is where discretionary funds come in, Lewis added.

“We’re growing so quickly, and these types of programs bring people in and sell the school,” he said.

Claire Byun: 843-626-0381, @Claire_TSN

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