Crime

North Myrtle Beach woman accused of killing two babies and throwing them in the trash

Daniel’s law provides safe havens for unwanted babies

Under Daniel's law, children 60 days old or younger may be left at safe havens, which are hospitals, fire stations, houses of worship and police stations.
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Under Daniel's law, children 60 days old or younger may be left at safe havens, which are hospitals, fire stations, houses of worship and police stations.

Over the course of 13 months, a local woman threw two babies in the trash soon after they were born, according to arrest warrants.

The North Myrtle Beach Police charged Alyssa Anne Dayvault with two counts of homicide by child abuse and two counts of destruction, desecration or removal of human remains. She faces life in prison if convicted.

Dayvault is being held without bond at J. Reuben Long Detention Center.

According to arrest warrants, in early December Dayvault was admitted to Grand Strand Regional Hospital with heavy bleeding. She delivered the placenta, but no child.

Hospital staff called the police, who spoke to Dayvault. She said she gave birth to a boy days earlier at her North Myrtle Beach residence, according to the warrants.

She said the boy was born alive and took gasping breaths, the warrants state. Dayvault didn’t seek medical attention and did not try to save the baby’s life, she told the police.

Dayvault disposed of the baby’s body in a waste receptacle at her residence, according to the warrants.

Police also say that a similar situation occurred in November 2017 when Dayvault gave birth to a girl. She didn’t seek medical attention and disposed of the baby in a waste receptacle.

Officers obtained Dayvault’s medical records, which showed in November 2017 she was pregnant and in the third trimester. The fetus had a healthy heart tone, according to the warrants.

Dayvault’s mother, Lois, declined to comment on the arrest.

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Alex Lang is the True Crime reporter for The Sun News covering the legal system and how crime impacts local residents. He says letting residents know if they are safe is a vital role of a newspaper. Alex has covered crime in Detroit, Iowa, New York City, West Virginia and now Horry County.

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