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Strand Notebook | Event offers insight into art at Brookgreen

The hard winter light lends an enhanced look of defeat to Anna Hyatt Huntington’s sculpture of Don Quixote, whom she portrays as a sad defeated figure with his lance broken after the battle. The sculpture is in the collection at Brookgreen Gardens, Murrells Inlet.
The hard winter light lends an enhanced look of defeat to Anna Hyatt Huntington’s sculpture of Don Quixote, whom she portrays as a sad defeated figure with his lance broken after the battle. The sculpture is in the collection at Brookgreen Gardens, Murrells Inlet. The Sun News file

Dr. Hal B. Holmes Jr. will give a lecture in the McCown Auditorium at the Horry County Museum June 13 at 1 p.m.

His presentation, “The Art of Esdaile Weston: Hagley Plantation, Snow Hill and the Waccamaw Region in the Time of the American Civil War,” begins at 1 p.m. and is free to the public. The Horry County Museum is at 805 Main St., Conway.

Weston’s art is currently on display at Brookgreen Gardens, 1931 Brookgreen Garden Drive, Murrells Inlet. The pencil and pen and ink drawings and watercolors, dating from the 1840s to the 1860s, are on loan to Brookgreen from the collection of Holmes and his wife, Margaret, and will be exhibited through July 26.

Esdaile Weston was the British wife of Plowden C. J. Weston, a 19th-century owner of Laurel Hill Plantation, the north section of Brookgreen Gardens’ property. According to information provided by Brookgreen, the collection provides unprecedented views of the buildings, structures and grounds of Laurel Hill and Hagley, Weston’s Waccamaw Neck properties, of Snow Hill at Conway and his seashore residence, “Weston’s Zoyland,” known today as Pelican Inn on Pawleys Island.

In addition to the landscape paintings and architectural drawings, there are a number of watercolors of native flora and fauna, many accompanied by a dried, pressed plant. Emily Weston also made drawings of Camp Marion during the Civil War.

Brookgreen Gardens is also currently exhibiting “Carolina Roots: Works by Sigmund Abeles and Grainger McKoy.” Their works in this exhibit include paintings, prints and drawings, and sculptures in wood, bronze and resin.

Abeles, born in New York, grew up in Myrtle Beach and watched Brookgreen Gardens grow into the “magnificent institution” that it is today. He refers to it as the place where he caught the “spark” of figurative art and as his “art womb,” in reference to the many hours he spent there as a youth, sketching the sculptures and learning about the artists. He went on to study art and to make it his life’s passion, earning numerous awards and honors. His drawings, prints, paintings and sculptures are found in museums and private collections throughout the United States. The exhibit includes several sculptures never before exhibited and other works reflecting his special bond with the S.C. Lowcountry.

Grainger McKoy, a renowned sculptor living and working near Sumter, also has a special relationship with Brookgreen, which has been a source of subjects and ideas for his depictions of native birds. In 2012, he was instrumental in helping Brookgreen acquire an “amazing gift” of his work from the collection of the late Earl Slick. The gift, containing several of his landmark sculptures, included 11 major wood and bronze pieces from the 1970s to the 1990s. Some of McKoy’s rarely seen sketches and small-scale models also will be on view.

For more information on the Horry County Museum, visit www.horrycountymuseum.org or call 915-5320. For more on Brookgreen Gardens, visit www.brookgreen.org or call 235-6000.

Contact PEGGY MISHOE at pegmish@sccoast.net or 365-3885.

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