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Strand Notebook | Rotary club keeps Little River beautiful

Rotary Club of Little River members help clean the area on April 25. Some of the members who worked were Jackie Andrews (from left), D.G. Schumacher, Leslie Olson, Craig Hill, Susan Cunnup and Gretchen Zotter.
Rotary Club of Little River members help clean the area on April 25. Some of the members who worked were Jackie Andrews (from left), D.G. Schumacher, Leslie Olson, Craig Hill, Susan Cunnup and Gretchen Zotter. For The Sun News

Members of the Rotary Club of Little River, known as “the little club with a big heart,” adopted a section of Mineola Avenue and took to the streets to do their part in keeping Little River beautiful April 25 as part of the Great American Clean-up Day in South Carolina.

Susan Vigar, who handles publicity for the club, said there were about 15 members out cleaning up on that rainy day. They exemplified Rotary values then and continue to do so as they work to improve Little River for the benefit of everyone.

The Rotary Club of Little River has about 29 members and welcomes new members. Vigar said they have fundraisers and donate to about 25 charities, including a homeless shelter, Teen Angels, Camp Chemo and more.

The Rotary Club of Little River meets every Wednesday from noon to 1 p.m. in the C.B. Berry Community Center at Vereen Gardens. The club was chartered in September of 2002 with John Bilton as its first president. Craig Hill, who continues to be a very active member and ambassador, was instrumental in starting the club.

Ed Murray is currently president. President-elect Kathy Toavs will take office in July.

The Rotary Club recently established the Interact Club at North Myrtle Beach Christian School. Interact clubs are service clubs for youth sponsored by individual Rotary clubs around the world. The Rotary Club of Little River provides support and guidance, but Interact clubs are self-governing and self-supporting, with goals that include developing leadership skills and personal integrity, demonstrating helpfulness and respect for others, understanding the value of individual responsibility and hard work, and advancing international understanding and goodwill.

Donna Levinski, a recent past president of the Rotary Club, is the school club’s new generations/youth service director. The adviser is Fawn Evans. The student members participate in community service activities in the school, sponsoring fundraisers for local and worldwide charities, and they assist the Rotary Club of Little River with its fundraisers. They worked at the St. Patrick Day’s Festival and plan to work at the club’s 5K Run on May 9 and at the Blue Crab Festival.

On May 20, the Interact Club’s officers will be guests at the Little River Rotary Club’s meeting and will be presented with their banner and Interact pins.

Graduating senior Josiah Morgan, who has displayed a heart for community service and outstanding educational goals, will receive a $1,000 scholarship.

What Rotary clubs do is based on the four-way test, with all answers to the following questions being “yes.”

Is it the truth? Is it fair to all concerned? Will it build goodwill and better friendships? Will it be beneficial to all concerned?

For more information about the Rotary Club of Little River, call Vigar at 399-6783.

Contact PEGGY MISHOE at pegmish@sccoast.net or 365-3885.

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