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Update: Here’s the latest on what a potential tropical cyclone could mean for the Strand

Hyperlapse shows a quiet Ocean Boulevard before Hurricane Dorian

Ocean Boulevard was quiet midday Wednesday as people prepared for Hurricane Dorian's arrival. Most hotels were closed, but few businesses had boarded up for the storm.
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Ocean Boulevard was quiet midday Wednesday as people prepared for Hurricane Dorian's arrival. Most hotels were closed, but few businesses had boarded up for the storm.

Myrtle Beach may see storms this weekend due to a potential tropical storm forming near the Bahamas, according to the National Hurricane Center..

While the storm’s path is still uncertain, many models show Myrtle Beach not being in its direct route as of an 11 a.m. update. The NWS said it is harder to predict the long-term trajectory of a storm weaker than a full tropical cyclone.

At this time, wind is what the Grand Strand can expect on Sunday as the storm gets closer to South Carolina. There is a lower than 40 percent chance we see sustained winds in excess of 39 mph.

The rain totals are expected to be a little over .6 inches in Myrtle Beach and below .5 inches in Horry County.

There is a good chance stronger rip currents are going to be a problem later into the weekend.

If the storm gets strong enough, it will be named Humberto.

Hurricane Dorian was a Category 2 storm when it skirted the Myrtle Beach coast on Sept. 5, thrashing the Grand Strand with bands of wind and rain that caused a few tornadoes.

Damage was less than anticipated in the area, however, because the storm turned to the north and east enough to avoid making landfall until it reached Cape Hatteras, N.C., on Sept. 6 as a Category 1 hurricane.

Hurricane season does not end until November, so stay prepared, y’all.

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