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A massive new neighborhood is now closer to being built in Conway. Here’s the latest

Collins Jollie Road development meeting gets heated

A Conway meeting to discuss a rezoning request for 673 acres off Collins Jollie Road to be changed to a planned development (PD) that would result in smaller lots and some commercial building became heated when several residents got upset.
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A Conway meeting to discuss a rezoning request for 673 acres off Collins Jollie Road to be changed to a planned development (PD) that would result in smaller lots and some commercial building became heated when several residents got upset.

Conway Planning Commission has recommended the City of Conway move forward with a massive new housing complex off Collins Jollie Road.

Commissioners voted on Thursday to send a rezoning request for the property on to city council. The request would rezone the site to a planned development district (PD) which would accommodate over 1,800 units on the outskirt of the city.

One stipulation is that the property owner look at implementing some sort of multi-use path along Collins Jollie Road to accommodate bicyclists and pedestrians.

Planning commission makes technical recommendations based on if the new zoning code is appropriate for the area based off the city’s ordinances. Thursday’s vote is not the final decision.

The ball is now in City Council’s court as elected officials must decided between allowing the developers to move forward with the planned development district or require the stick with their current R1 zoning code of low/medium density. Under the current zoning code about 1,500 homes can be built on the 600 acre parcel.

Click the links to read previous Sun News articles on this development.

  • The Plans: DDC Engineer Mike Wooten, representing the property owner, said the land will be developed under either zoning code, but that the PDD is a better project for the city. His client is willing to offer additional money to help cover the development’s strain on public services.
  • The criticism: City and county residents in the area worry about increased flooding and traffic as a result of all the homes. Homeowner James DeCaro said it could ruin the rural character of his community.
  • What’s next: Due to a personal issue, the applicant asked the city to move the council votes until December, according to Planning Director Mary Catherine Hyman. Once it is on an agenda, the city council will give the rezoning two readings with public comment.
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