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Tropical Depression dissipates, but severe weather still looms for Myrtle Beach

How to survive if you get caught in a rip current

Rip currents are powerful, narrow channels of fast-moving water and can be deadly if you don't know what to do. This video from NOAA Ocean Today shows you how to survive if you are caught in one off the coast.
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Rip currents are powerful, narrow channels of fast-moving water and can be deadly if you don't know what to do. This video from NOAA Ocean Today shows you how to survive if you are caught in one off the coast.

The Grand Strand may still see severe thunderstorms and wind gusts though Tropical Depression 3 has dissipated, and now lingers around the Florida coast, according to the National Weather Service.

The Myrtle Beach area has an 80 percent chance of severe thunderstorms with damaging winds as a cold front moves across the Carolinas, the NWS in Wilmington, North Carolina reports. The weather service initially reported the tropical depression would combine with the cold front, bringing dangerous swimming conditions and rain.

Severe thunderstorms could develop ahead of the cold front Tuesday afternoon and evening, bringing up to 2 inches of rainfall. Winds could reach speeds up to 18 mph in Myrtle Beach, the weather service reports.

The area is under a beach hazards statement through 8 p.m. Tuesday. Swimmers should take caution when entering the ocean, the NWS reports.

The Sun News Reporter Hannah Strong is passionate about making the world better through what she reports and writes. Strong, who is a Pawleys Island native, is quick to jump on breaking news, profiles stories about people in the community and obituaries. Strong has won four S.C. Press Association first-place awards, including one for enterprise reporting after riding along with police during a homicide. She earned a bachelor’s degree in communications from Winthrop University.
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