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Here’s the latest on the rebuilding of Myrtle Beach piers damaged by recent hurricanes

Springmaid Pier obliterated by Hurricane Matthew

Storm surge from Hurricane Matthew demolished the majority of the Springmaid Pier on Saturday in Myrtle Beach.
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Storm surge from Hurricane Matthew demolished the majority of the Springmaid Pier on Saturday in Myrtle Beach.

Two popular fishing piers in the Myrtle Beach area are getting an upgrade.

Following severe damage caused from Hurricane Matthew and Hurricane Florence, Springmaid Pier and the Myrtle Beach State Park pier will undergo construction to ensure public safety for beachgoers this summer.

Construction on Springmaid Pier, which closed in 2016 after suffering severe storm damage, began earlier this month with construction expected to be completed sometime next year, barring any weather delays.

“We’re really excited about that,” said Alan Fabris, director of sales and marketing at DoubleTree Resort. “That pier is iconic. It’s a big deal.”

Sabris said the 1,000-foot pier will feature a restaurant, gift shop and tackle shop.

Work to rebuild the Myrtle Beach State Park fishing pier will begin on June 1 with construction expected to be completed in September.

Myrtle Beach State Park assistant manager Amanda Jenkins said the pier lost a few pilings from both hurricanes. She said some repairs had been made to the pier following Hurricane Matthew but most of the damage came from Hurricane Florence.

“The stuff that’s being fixed right now are from the storms from last summer,” Jenkins said. “Replacing the pilings will maintain the safety and integrity of the pier.”

Myrtle Beach fishing pier.jpg
A portion of the Myrtle Beach State Park fishing pier closed earlier this month, but the entire pier is expected to be shut down for repairs through September. Anna Young Photo by Anna Young

While a portion of the pier closed earlier this month for public safety purposes, Jenkins said the pier gift shop will remain open while repairs are made. Bids are currently out to enlist a contractor for the roughly $950,000 state-funded project, according Dawn Dawson-House, director of corporate communications with the Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism.

“We normally have to repair and replace pilings but the storms and heavy waves have done significant damage, so we’re replacing those for public safety,” Dawson-House said.

While Jenkins expects construction on both piers to cause an inconvenience to locals, she still expects to have a busy summer.

“We get a lot of locals and fisherman coming in everyday, and I’m sure that will have an impact,” Jenkins said. “I think they will still come to the park regardless of the pier.”

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