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Myrtle Beach Food Truck Festival has something for everyone: Here’s what you need to know

Thousands attend first Myrtle Beach Food Truck Festival

The first Myrtle Beach Food Truck Festival was held at the site of the old Pavilion on Saturday, April 1, 2017. Over two dozen food stands were set up on the site and thousands of visitors came to eat, play games and listen to live bands.
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The first Myrtle Beach Food Truck Festival was held at the site of the old Pavilion on Saturday, April 1, 2017. Over two dozen food stands were set up on the site and thousands of visitors came to eat, play games and listen to live bands.

The Myrtle Beach Food Truck Festival will have something for everyone with more than two dozen food trucks showcasing their appetizing delicacies this weekend.

The popular three-day food festival will feature 30 food trucks and kick off Friday, Apr. 26 from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. at the Burroughs and Chapin Pavilion Place between 8th and 9th Avenues North. The event, which is free to all, will also run Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.

While the festival will be a foodie’s delight, there will also be live entertainment, two beer stations, a corn hole tournament, kid-friendly activities and fun for all.

Here’s what you need to know when you attend the 2019 Myrtle Beach Food Festival:

Food & Drinks

If you want it, they’ve got it.

Whether your taste buds crave savory cuisine, sweet treats, ice cream or just a simple cup of coffee, then you’re in luck. The featured food trucks will provide an array of options, including barbeque, burgers, pizza, grilled cheese, tacos, gyros, noodles, kielbasa, pierogi’s, ice cream, snow cones, roasted nuts, and more. Attendees can purchase food directly from the vendor.

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The first Myrtle Beach Food Truck Festival was held at the site of the old Pavilion on Saturday, April 1, 2017. Over two dozen food stands were set up on the site and thousands of visitors came to eat, play games and listen to live bands. JASON LEE jlee@thesunnews.com

Visit www.myrtlebeachfoodtruckfestival.com/ to view the diverse lineup.

Thirsty? You may be prohibited from bringing your own cooler, but you can grab a beer or a glass of wine courtesy of Duplin Winery at the two beer stations located throughout the festival. Attendees must have a valid ID and alcoholic beverages are cash only.

Entertainment

Who doesn’t enjoy listening to live music during a great meal? A group of local bands are scheduled to perform throughout the festival, so grab your lawn chairs, kick back and relax.

0401foodtruck_jl21
The first Myrtle Beach Food Truck Festival was held at the site of the old Pavilion on Saturday, April 1, 2017. Over two dozen food stands were set up on the site and thousands of visitors came to eat, play games and listen to live bands. JASON LEE jlee@thesunnews.com

Check out the lineup below:

Friday:

Saturday:

Sunday:

Activities

Show off your tossing talents and sign up for the cornhole tournament on Saturday and Sunday at noon. The tournament, hosted by Coastal Tailgating, has a $10 entry fee that includes a blind draw and 100% payout. Participants are encouraged to bring their own partner. Registration begins at 11 a.m. To pre-register visit, www.coastaltailgating.com/tournament-registration/.

For younger festival-goers, there will be a Kidz zone area with bounce houses, carnival games, rock wall, slides and other activities. Attendees are encouraged to bring cash or credit cards with each vendor assigning their own prices for each activity.

Other Information

No pets will be allowed at the festival. Exceptions will be made for service dogs.

There will be ATM machines located on festival grounds.

Attendees are encouraged to bring lawn chairs and blankets, but coolers will be prohibited.

For more information about the festival, call 843-918-4909 or visit www.myrtlebeachfoodtruckfestival.com.

Anna Young is the Coastal Cities reporter for The Sun News covering anything and everything that happens locally. Young, an award-winning journalist who got her start reporting local news in New York, is dedicated to upholding the values of journalism by listening, learning, seeking out the truth and reporting it accurately. She earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism from SUNY Purchase College.


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