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‘A super project’: The new Myrtle Beach VA facility one step closer to being built

99-year-old World War II veteran honored on Pearl Harbor Day

Louis Serotta, a 99-year-old World War II veteran, joins his family and friends for lunch to honor Pearl Harbor Day at Hayes Barton Cafe in Raleigh on Friday, Dec. 7, 2018.
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Louis Serotta, a 99-year-old World War II veteran, joins his family and friends for lunch to honor Pearl Harbor Day at Hayes Barton Cafe in Raleigh on Friday, Dec. 7, 2018.

The new Veterans Affairs outpatient center in Myrtle Beach is one step closer to being built.

Horry County currently owns the land on which the VA hospital would be built.

An ordinance allowing Horry County to sell the land to the Myrtle Beach VA Company passed second reading this week. It will go on to third reading at the next council meeting, and if approved, the land along Airpark Drive in the Market Common area will be sold for $2.35 million.

The council voted unanimously to move it forward to third reading. The money from the sale would go to the Myrtle Beach International Airport because it is their property.

The resolution had to be pushed on to council before committee to meet federal deadlines, but it will go in front of Horry County Council’s Transportation Committee at its next meeting on March 13.

“Which is a super project,” council member Al Allen said.

Once completed, the facility will be two stories and over 100,000 square feet. The aim is to make veterans feel comfortable and welcomed while they await care at the center.

The developer, GuvCar JV, has worked on similar facilities across the county. Representative Rustom Khouri said the hope is to start construction in June and finish by November 2020. Once the building is completed, it will take some time for the VA to move its equipment in.

Some of the improvements include walking paths, an easy-to-navigate facility and a “wall of heroes,” which hopes to tell the stories of other veterans.

“Something that can pay homage to those who have gone before and sacrificed their lives for our country,” Khouri said. “The veterans have loved it.”

Khouri said the building will have a pedestrian-first mindset, meaning the layout will be easy to navigate on foot for veterans and their families.

Development and Horry County reporter Tyler Fleming joined The Sun News in May of 2018. He covers other stuff too, like reporting on beer, bears, breaking news and Coastal Carolina University. He graduated from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2018 and was the 2017-18 editor-in-chief of The Daily Tar Heel. He has won (and lost) several college journalism awards.
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