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Hurricane Florence Concert raised over $100,000, mayor announces

Myrtle Beach mayor announces total amount raised in Florence Benefit Concert

Hurricane Florence: Myrtle Beach’s benefit concert helped raise $100,000 for the storm and flood relief that is still ongoing even months after the storm first hit. Darius Rucker was among the artists who contributed.
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Hurricane Florence: Myrtle Beach’s benefit concert helped raise $100,000 for the storm and flood relief that is still ongoing even months after the storm first hit. Darius Rucker was among the artists who contributed.

As Myrtle Beach Mayor Brenda Bethune handed checks for $64,162 to representatives from The American Red Cross and Waccamaw Community Foundation, hundreds in the county are still figuring out how to recover from the devastating flood that occurred nearly three months earlier.

The proceeds came from November’s Hurricane Florence Benefit Concert, which brought several country music stars to Myrtle Beach to raise money for people recovering from the flood.

“We rise by lifting others up, and that was the whole purpose of the Hurricane Florence Benefit Concert,” Bethune said.

The concert was held Nov. 11 at the Myrtle Beach Pelican’s stadium. Artists like Darius Rucker, Michael Ray and others performed for a crowd of over 3,000 people.

In total the concert raised $128,324, with 100 percent of proceeds split between the Red Cross and Waccamaw Community Foundation. Bethune said these two charities were picked based off their work in Horry County and the trust people have in them.

“We wanted people to have that assurance that the money would be well used,” the mayor said.

A stadium normally filled with baseball fans was overtaken by cowboy boots and country artists Sunday, as people gathered together to raise money for flood victims at the Hurricane Florence Benefit Concert.

Amy Brauner, the director of the eastern South Carolina chapter of the Red Cross, said the money would go to helping flood victims rebuild and recover from the storm.

“It’s going to go to all of those affected families from Hurricane Florence, the flooding and all of the disaster including fires that we handled during that time frame,” she said.

Immediately after the storm, the Red Cross helped people survive with shelters and foods. Now, they’re looking at connecting families with longer term help.

Brauner encouraged people to stay involved and find ways to help flood victims this holiday season. She said people can continue to donate to the local Red Cross through its website and to consider giving blood.

“We please ask people to give some blood,” she said. “It can help save up to three lives.”

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