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‘Please don’t get complacent’: Emergency officials warn about flooding in Horry County

OEM Director speaks about roads as people return following hurricane

Horry County Office of Emergency Management Director Randy Webster talks about routes into the Myrtle Beach area as people return following Hurricane Florence.
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Horry County Office of Emergency Management Director Randy Webster talks about routes into the Myrtle Beach area as people return following Hurricane Florence.

Horry County emergency officials say if residents had flooding during Hurricane Matthew, they should expect it again during the aftermath of Florence.

With record rainfall, waters coming from North Carolina and rivers reaching major flood status later this week, people who were close to flooded areas in 2016 should be ready as well.

“Three times in four years is very difficult,” said Randy Webster, director of the Horry County Office of Emergency Management. “Do what you need to get ready for this one more time.”

Forecasters are predicting both the Little Pee Dee River in Galivants Ferry and the Waccamaw River in Conway to reach major flood status by the end of the week. Record rainfall from Hurricane Florence has led to flooding in Horry County.

Signs of flooding were already present Sunday in some areas of Horry County, especially in Conway. Conway city officials also expressed concerns with the county and state’s flood-mitigation plan on the U.S. Highway 501 bridge. They say the plan could lead to additional flooding in the city.

There aren’t a lot of steps people can take before the flooding, Webster said, but they can ensure they have a few days of supplies.

“We’re hoping this will not pan out,” he said.

Horry County Council Chair Mark Lazarus warned people not to focus on the storm leaving the area.

“Please don’t get complacent,” Lazarus said. “We’re still going to have issues coming forward.”

The county works with state and federal officials using expert models to make decisions ahead of flooding, Lazarus said. Decisions are made to protect the lives of Horry County citizens, he added.

“Horry County is not doing this alone,” Lazarus said.

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