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‘Thought I better go take one more look at it.’ Locals visit the beach before the storm.

European hurricane model shows Florence impacting the Carolinas then lingering in the area

The ECMWF model shows Hurricane Florence lingering near the Carolinas and Georgia for several days.
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The ECMWF model shows Hurricane Florence lingering near the Carolinas and Georgia for several days.

Hurricane Florence is due to hit the Grand Strand on Thursday and Friday, and even though the governor ordered an evacuation of Myrtle Beach, not everyone has heeded that warning … yet.

Jenna Griffith, 31, and Josh Holford, 34, debated whether to ride out the storm in their home, about a quarter of a mile from the shoreline in Myrtle Beach.

The likelihood of South Carolina’s coast being without electricity for a prolonged amount of time, though, made the couple decide to flee.

On Wednesday afternoon, they took a quick walk along the boardwalk. They planned to leave around midnight, headed to Atlanta.

Others, though, have been prepping for days for Hurricane Florence and said they feel ready.

“We’re prepared with food and water that can last us a month,” said Debbie Davis, a Carolina Forest resident.

She and her husband, Rich, have lived 13 years in a house about 6 miles from where Florence is expected to make landfall.

“We’re sticking around,” she said, adding that about three-fourths of her neighbors in Covington Lakes intend to stay in their homes as well.

The Davis’ say they’re not nervous about their choice to not evacuate because they’ve fared well during four previous storms, including Hurricane Matthew.

But, they anticipate Florence will pack a heavy punch on the beach town they love.

On Wednesday, Debbie and Rich took one more stroll on Ocean Boulevard with their Maltese-Yorkie mix dog, Riley.

“I love the ocean,” Debbie Davis said. “Thought I better go take one more look at it before it flies over there.”

Follow more of our reporting on Hurricane Florence

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