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Hurricane projected path shifts, Myrtle Beach now facing “extreme” threat

Satellite footage shows eye of Hurricane Florence moving closer to Carolinas

Satellite imagery shows the eye of Hurricane Florence as it moves toward the U.S. East Coast on the morning of Sept. 12, 2018. The center is located approximately 530 miles southeast of Cape Fear, North Carolina, with sustained winds at 130 mph.
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Satellite imagery shows the eye of Hurricane Florence as it moves toward the U.S. East Coast on the morning of Sept. 12, 2018. The center is located approximately 530 miles southeast of Cape Fear, North Carolina, with sustained winds at 130 mph.

The projected path of Hurricane Florence shows a shift that now puts the Myrtle Beach area in line for a near-direct hit from the storm that’s expected to bring “life-threatening conditions.”

According to a Wednesday morning update from the National Weather Service, the eye of the Hurricane is expected to be off the North Carolina coast on Friday at 2 p.m. as a Category 3 hurricane. It’s thought to be slowly moving and make landfall near the stateline at 2 a.m. on Saturday.

When it makes land its might weaken slightly bring less powerful winds.

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Provided by the National Weather Service

It’s expected to remain in the Pee Dee area until 2 a.m. Sunday as it continues to weaken and shift west.

The path’s shift has been dramatic over the last 24 hours where Tuesday’s projections called for a route with a projected landfall near Wilmington, North Carolina and the storm to travel north.

The new path is expected to bring nine or more inches of rain to the Myrtle Beach area and higher amounts in the north, according to the National Weather Service. Most of Horry County is listed as having a high risk of flooding rain.

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Provided by the National Weather Service

Wind threat is listed as “extreme” throughout the county, which means to expect structural damage to building, destruction of mobile homes, widespread tree damage and downed power lines and long-duration power outages.

Storm surge is still listed as a moderate threat by the National Weather Service with more dire conditions along North Carolina coastline.

Reverse lanes bopened along Highway 501 in Myrtle Beach, S.C. on September 11, 2018 for evacuation routes ahead of Hurricane Florence.

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