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Everything you need to know for the evacuation for the Myrtle Beach area

You have 10 minutes to evacuate. Are you ready?

You can’t predict when disaster will strike, so make sure you have a plan. Here are nine things you can do to prepare for a future evacuation.
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You can’t predict when disaster will strike, so make sure you have a plan. Here are nine things you can do to prepare for a future evacuation.

Myrtle Beach area residents are strongly encouraged to evacuate now that the order has been given by Gov. Henry McMaster ahead of Hurricane Florence’s landfall later this week.

“You take your own life into your hands,” Myrtle Beach spokesman Mark Kruea said about those who decide to ignore the order.

Years ago, the state dropped the “mandatory” and “voluntary” aspect of the evacuations, Kruea said. While officials are “not going to drag you out of your house,” there is a danger to stay.

Property is replaceable, but people are not, Kruea said. There could be an issue after the storm hits where first responders can’t get to someone if there is an emergency situation.

Evacuations in the Horry County and Georgetown areas are based on three zones. Locals can find their zone by referring to a map provided by the state. However, all three zones have been told to evacuate.

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Evacuation zone map S.C. Emergency Management Division

The state has mandated routes depending on where locals live if there are evacuations. The routes are:

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Provided by the SC Department of Public Safety

  • North Myrtle Beach and northward: Evacuees from Briarcliff Acres and northward will take SC 9 north to I-95 and beyond.
  • Briarcliff Acres south to Myrtle Beach 10th Avenue North: Evacuees from Briarcliff Acres south to 10thAvenue North will take SC 22 (Conway Bypass) to US 501 to Marion. In Marion, they may then take US 76 to Florence to access I-95 southbound or they may stay on US 501 to SC 38 to access I-95 northbound.
  • Myrtle Beach, from 10th Avenue North south to the Myrtle Beach Airport: Evacuees from the Myrtle Beach area south of 10th Avenue North and north of the Myrtle Beach Airport will take US 501 to Conway. They may then take US 378 to Columbia or continue on US 501 to Marion. In Marion, they may take US 76 to Florence to access I-95 southbound or they may stay on US 501 to SC 38 to access I-95 northbound.
  • Myrtle Beach Airport southward through Surfside Beach: Evacuees from the Myrtle Beach area from the Myrtle Beach Airport southward through Surfside Beach will take SC 544 to US 501 to Conway. They then may take US 378 to Columbia or continue on US 501 to Marion. In Marion, they may take US 76 to Florence to access I-95 southbound or they may stay on US 501 to SC 38 to access I-95 northbound.
  • Garden City Beach south to Winyah Bay: Evacuees from Garden City Beach southward to Winyah Bay will take US 17 south through Georgetown. They then take US 521 to SC 261 to US 378 to Columbia. Alternatively, they may take US 17 south to US 701 in Georgetown to SC 51 to US 378 at Kingsburg.

The state of South Carolina is preparing for some level of impact from Hurricane Florence, Gov. Henry McMaster announced Sunday.



The state’s Department of Health and Environmental Control provided several tips to help people before an evacuation.

  • Make a family communication plan using the instructions found at Ready.gov.
  • Make sure there is gas in the car so that you can be ready to evacuate immediately.
  • Make sure your automobile’s emergency kit is fully stocked and ready.
  • Tune in the radio or television for weather updates and evacuation updates.
  • Take action when you think severe weather may be moving into your area, even if no official warning is given.
  • Determine your evacuation destination and write out your route.
  • Store home and lawn-care chemicals above areas that could be flooded.
  • Shut off the water to the house.
  • Let people know when you are leaving and where you are going. If possible, leave contact information.
  • Lock the windows and doors.
  • Close blinds and drapes.
  • Put plastic bags over TVs, stereos, lamps, computers, etc.
  • Fill the sinks and bathtubs with water to use for bathing, washing clothes, flushing, when you return.
  • Pack some clothes in plastic bags and store on high shelves
  • Adjust the refrigerator and freezer to the coolest possible setting.
  • Follow the instructions provided by local utility companies or emergency preparedness officials regarding the turning off of electric and gas utilities.
  • Find a secure place for boats or second cars. Place under cover if possible.
  • Trim trees and shrubs of weak limbs.
  • Cover windows and doors with shutters or plywood if possible. If that is not possible, place large strips of masking tape across the windows to reduce the possibility of flying glass.
  • Bring inside or otherwise secure items outdoors such as lawn furniture, bird feeders, bicycles, grills, propane tanks and planters.
  • Check on your neighbors, especially the elderly to make sure they do not need assistance in evacuating.
  • Put your survival supplies in the car. If officials order an evacuation, leave as soon as possible, preferably during daylight.

Re-entry procedures are as follows from the City of North Myrtle Beach:

“When re-entering the city of North Myrtle Beach after a hurricane evacuation, property owners, renters and business owners should be prepared to show either their driver’s license, a copy of a recent water bill or property tax bill, a rental agreement, or other form of identity that proves residency or property ownership within the city.

“Owners of businesses with employees who do not reside within the city limits but who are essential to business recovery should provide those employees with a letter written on company letterhead identifying them as being essential to the recovery of the business. When identifying an employee, please use their name as shown on their driver’s license so that authorities can match the two for verification.”

The National Weather Service recommends to have these things handy during a hurricane.

The agency also has several tips once an evacuation is ordered:

  • Take only essential items with you.
  • Follow the instructions provided by local utility companies or emergency preparedness officials regarding the turning off of electric and gas utilities.
  • Disconnect appliances to reduce the likelihood of electrical shock when power is restored.
  • Make sure your automobile’s emergency kit is with you.
  • Follow the designated evacuation routes — others may be blocked — and expect heavy traffic.
  • Avoid flooded roads and watch for washed-out bridges. Traffic tends to move slowly as evacuation routes become crowded.
  • Know that evacuation will probably take longer than expected, so give yourself plenty of time. More importantly, be patient.
Follow more of our reporting on Hurricane Florence

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