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Going to the beach Friday? Watch out for jellyfish

What to do if you encounter a jellyfish or stingray at the beach

A lifeguard supervisor at Hunting Island State Park gives a few tips for what to do if you are injured by a stingray or a jellyfish while swimming at the beach.
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A lifeguard supervisor at Hunting Island State Park gives a few tips for what to do if you are injured by a stingray or a jellyfish while swimming at the beach.

Watch out for jellyfish if you’re going to the beach.

The National Weather Service issued a beach advisory Thursday evening warning of jellyfish, which can inflict painful stings with their tentacles.

The weather service warns of the stinging creatures in Georgetown, Horry and Brunswick counties.

“The jellyfish are small and mostly a nuisance, stinging feet of beachgoers,” the advisory says.

The warning is in place until 8 p.m. Another warning is being issued for Friday as well.

According to ABC 4, Portuguese Man O’ War were spotted along Folly Beach Thursday as well.

Those jellyfish inflict some particularly painful stings.

According to the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, “symptoms include severe shooting pain described as a shock-like sensation, and intense joint and muscle pain. Pain may be accompanied by headaches, shock, collapse, faintness, hysteria, chills, fever, nausea and vomiting.”

Sullivan's Island, South Carolina, is warning tourists to be on the lookout for Portuguese men-o'-war. Several have been seen on the community's popular beaches.

According to DNR, there are several types of jellyfish that live along South Carolina’s coast.

DNR says that if stung, the first thing to do is make sure all tentacles have been removed from contact with the skin. Meat tenderizer, sugar, vinegar, plant juices and sodium bicarbonate have all been used to treat stings, DNR says.

Christian Boschult, 843-626-0218, @TSN_Christian

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