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Boom! Carolina Forest area rattles after two explosions from ordnance found

The empty lot along Carolina Forest Blvd. (which was previously an air to ground impact range) is being rezoned as a commercial and residential area.  As construction crews were clearing an empty lot along Carolina Forest Blvd. they came across several ordnance items and called local law enforcement who then notified Shaw EOD personnel requesting a response to the items found as a part of the military munitions law. EOD personnel detonated 12 total pieces of ordnance, with only four of them were filled with explosives while the other eight were not.
The empty lot along Carolina Forest Blvd. (which was previously an air to ground impact range) is being rezoned as a commercial and residential area. As construction crews were clearing an empty lot along Carolina Forest Blvd. they came across several ordnance items and called local law enforcement who then notified Shaw EOD personnel requesting a response to the items found as a part of the military munitions law. EOD personnel detonated 12 total pieces of ordnance, with only four of them were filled with explosives while the other eight were not.

If you heard two big bangs in the Carolina Forest area Wednesday afternoon, it was ordnance that was located and later detonated by a crew from Shaw Air Force Base.

"The Former Myrtle Air Station (which was previously an air to ground impact range) is being rezoned as a commercial and residential area," U.S. Air Force Lt. Alannah Staver said in a written statement. "As construction crews were clearing the area, they came across several ordnance items and called local law enforcement who then notified Shaw EOD personnel requesting we respond to the items found as a part of the military munitions law."

Horry County Police provided traffic control while the Army Corps of Engineers were on scene, said police spokesperson Krystal Dotson.

Residents in the area reported a loud boom and houses shaking around The Farm subdivision.

"When we respond to a request from law enforcement, the team first identifies the ordnance item, renders it safe to ensure it can be transported safely, and finally moves it to a safe location for detonation," Staver told The Sun News. "For safety purposes, all ordnance items are considered potentially hazardous until we can determine the condition. Older items are considered more volatile due to the unstable explosive fillers they consist of."

Staver said EOD personnel detonated a total of 12 ordnance, but only four of them were filled with explosives.

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