Local

Savannah’s Playground, a park for special needs kids, wins excellence award

Savannah’s Playground opened Saturday

Savannah's Playground officially opened on Saturday, Sept. 3, 2016. Named for Savannah Thompson, a 19-year-old local with William's Syndrome, the $1.5 million facility is designed for children of all abilities to enjoy and features unique ADA appr
Up Next
Savannah's Playground officially opened on Saturday, Sept. 3, 2016. Named for Savannah Thompson, a 19-year-old local with William's Syndrome, the $1.5 million facility is designed for children of all abilities to enjoy and features unique ADA appr

Savannah’s Playground won the 2017 Excellence Award presented by the South Carolina Recreation and Parks Association, according to a post from the Myrtle Beach City Government Facebook page.

The playground, which is located in The Market Common, is considered an “enabling park,” designed to meet the needs of disabled children. The park cost nearly $1.5 million and was named after Savannah Thompson, who has Williams Syndrome. The Williams Syndrome Association describes it as a genetic condition that can cause cardiovascular disease, developmental delays and learning disabilities.

The park consists of an early childhood playground, a school-age playground, an interactive playground, a harmony musical park with percussive instruments that can be played, challenge ropes and swing sets.

A map on the Savannah’s Playground website shows space for a water park in the future.

“Savannah’s Playground could not have come to life without the support and partnerships of many community stakeholders,” the Facebook post reads. “The City of Myrtle Beach started with the donation of the land and $350,000. Partnership contributions included $300,000 from the Myrtle Beach Air Force Base Redevelopment Authority and $100,000 from Horry County.”

Savannah’s Playground is one of the key accomplishments for Myrtle Beach Mayor John Rhodes.

“That’s special because that was for the kids, the kids with special needs, the kids that need somewhere to play to teach them joy, to be able to be a part of life the way it should be,” Rhodes said. “That’s one of my best accomplishments.”

The award was presented during the joint N.C./S.C. Recreation Conference in Greensboro, North Carolina.

Megan Tomasic: 843-626-0343, @MeganTomasic

Related stories from Myrtle Beach Sun News

  Comments