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Movie review | If you liked ‘Entourage’ on HBO, you’ll like it on the big screen

Mark Wahlberg, from left, Adrian Grenier, Kevin Dillon, Jerry Ferrara, Jeremy Piven and Rex Lee arrive at the Los Angeles premiere of “Entourage” at the Westwood Regency Village Theatre on June 1. Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP.
Mark Wahlberg, from left, Adrian Grenier, Kevin Dillon, Jerry Ferrara, Jeremy Piven and Rex Lee arrive at the Los Angeles premiere of “Entourage” at the Westwood Regency Village Theatre on June 1. Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP. Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

I don’t have HBO, but I once did and enjoyed the series “Entourage,” as did millions around the world. The original production ran between 2004 and 2011, introducing many to Jeremy Piven as Ari Gold, a driven, acerbic and brilliant (if not neurotic) Hollywood movie agent.

The series also launched pretty boy Adrian Genier as Vincent Chase, a ridiculously good-looking but humble Queens boy-turned Hollywood action hero. The movie version, written by the series creator, Doug Ellin, serves as a storyline continuation, taking place about six months after the series ended.

“Entourage” (the film) is at its best, as was the series, when it focuses on the three fiercely loyal friends who serve as Chase’s entourage. Their witty banter is often very funny, and sometimes tender.

The film is loaded with celebrity cameos, too numerous to mention, who help reinforce just how whacked out Hollywood really is. Former child star Haley Joel Osment turns in a surprisingly excellent performance as the son of a Texan movie financier, played by Billy Bob Thornton.

Plenty of T&A, more than I remembered from the series, adds a bit of naughtiness to a film that is at times a somewhat misogynistic male fantasy, but is mostly about family and friends struggling in a strange faraway land … with millions of dollars to spend any way they damn well please.

Bottom line: If you loved the HBO series, you’ll like the film.

What do those stars mean?

* Really, really, really bad. Don’t bother.

** Pretty bad, with one or more redeeming scenes.

*** Pretty good, but maybe not great, worth seeing for most

**** Really great, a winning combination of story, casting, and directing

***** The rarest gem, an all-around perfect motion picture

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