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Music Notes | The Dead 27s bring award-winning show back to Myrtle Beach

Charleston-based Dead 27s, five men, all in their late 20s and early 30s, pay homage to the greats by performing and recording original genre-bending music they hope worthy of this club for which they’ve named their band. The Dead 27s will return to Bourbon Street Bar & Grill in Myrtle Beach, Saturday June 27.
Charleston-based Dead 27s, five men, all in their late 20s and early 30s, pay homage to the greats by performing and recording original genre-bending music they hope worthy of this club for which they’ve named their band. The Dead 27s will return to Bourbon Street Bar & Grill in Myrtle Beach, Saturday June 27. Courtesy photo by Ian Rawn

Kurt Cobain (Nirvana), Janis Joplin, Amy Winehouse, Jim Morrison (The Doors), Brian Jones (The Rolling Stones), and Jimi Hendrix, all left an indelible mark on rock music, and all died at 27.

Their untimely deaths gave rise to the “27 Club,” a club in which membership is not something most would seek out.

Charleston-based Dead 27s, five men all in their late 20s and early 30s, pay homage to the greats by performing and recording original genre-bending music they hope worthy of this club for which they’ve named their band. The Dead 27s will return to Bourbon Street Bar & Grill in Myrtle Beach June 27.

“We played a gig there a couple of months back,” said Will Evans, guitarist, back-up vocalist and synth player. Evans and lead vocalist Trey Francis live in Greeneville, S.C., though the band considers Charleston home base.

“We had a really good time [in Myrtle Beach], and are excited to be coming back.”

Not familiar with this band? Charleston City Paper named Dead 27s’ Wallace Mullinax “Charleston Guitarist of the Year” for the third straight year (2012 – 2014), and the band won “Song of the Year,” “Rock Band of the Year,” “Album of the Year,” and more in 2014.

Not bad for a band that’s less than three years old.

Drummer Daniel Crider won “Drummer of the Year,” and bassist Oliver Goldstein won “Bassist of the Year” in 2014 as well. VH-1 honored the band as a semi-finalist in its “Make a Band Famous” competition. This is a band to catch, especially at an intimate venue, such as Bourbon Street.

The band tours the East Coast extensively and works on average three to four nights per week.

“Back in April we worked even more,” said Evans. “We’re pretty much grinding it out.”

The band describes its style as “hints of classic rock, soul, funk,” said Evans with some difficulty. “Everyone in the band would probably describe us differently.”

The critics in Charleston who know their music, say “old school rock, while making their music relevant to today’s listeners,” according to Jamisphere. “Timeless music with impassioned variety,” according to Charleston Magazine.

What to expect at Saturday’s show?

“We’ll do a few a covers, play good long sets,” said Evans, though the highlights will undoubtedly include tracks from the band’s 2013 debut EP “Chase Your Devils Down,” including the Charleston City Paper “Song(s) of the Year,” in 2013 and 2014.

The band’s music is available at the usual online sites, including the www.dead27s.com website. “Don’t Want to Live My Life Without You” is part Bruno Mars, part blue-eyed soul and sets vocalist Trey Francis a cut way above average.

If the Dead 27s can live up to their critical acclaim and hype, this should be a show not to miss, and a band to watch.

Have a thought, comment or newsworthy item for Weekly Surge Music Notes? Send an email to pgrimshaw@sc.rr.com.

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