Outdoors

Local fishing report, July 3

Estuary

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Look For

| Flounder, red drum, spotted seatrout, black drum, sheepshead.



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Comments

| Obviously, the estuary waters are churned up after Hurricane Arthur passed by with wind and rain on Thursday. Capt. Mark Dickson of Shallow-Minded Inshore Charters in Little River, which received several inches of rain, expects fishing to return to normal quickly. ``It’s going to take it a few days for the water to clear up but the fish are in their summertime pattern,” said Dickson. On the north end of the Grand Strand, Dickson says look for red drum at the jetties, flounder in Cherry Grove Inlet and Tubbs Inlet, plus Dickson has landed spotted seatrout in the Crossroads vicinity. In Georgetown, Capt. Mike McDonald of Gul-R-Boy Guide Service has caught red drum, flounder and trout on his trips, and more than enough sharks. “We’re catching a bunch of sharks from 12 to 18 inches, whether its plastics, menhaden, whatever you’re throwing,” said McDonald. “If you can get away from the sharks you might be able to catch some fish.”



Inshore

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Look For

| Spanish mackerel, spadefish, king mackerel, bluefish, cobia, black sea bass, whiting, pompano, flounder, black drum, croaker.



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Comments

| Hurricane Arthur did a real number on the nearshore waters of the Atlantic on Thursday, but water conditions will quickly return to normal starting on Friday. Before the storm, Spanish mackerel were the top catch, especially near inlet passes and around bottom structure and artificial reefs such as Jim Caudle Reef and Paradise Reef. The reefs continue to hold good numbers of spadefish and flounder, along with black sea bass and the occasional cobia. Remember black sea bass have a 13-inch minimum size limit. The water near the beach looked like an angry chocolate milkshake Thursday afternoon, but when conditions improve, Grand Strand piers will produce a variety of species including Spanish, blues, whiting, croaker, flounder, black drum, sheepshead and spots. Ocean water temperature was 83.08 degrees Thursday at 4 p.m. at 2nd Ave. Pier in Myrtle Beach.



Offshore

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Look For

| Dolphin, blackfin tuna, wahoo, sailfish, grouper, vermilion snapper, triggerfish, porgy, amberjack.



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Comments

| A passing hurricane causes movement of fish, so don’t be surprised to find species such as dolphin and grouper much closer to shore than normal as the water settles down and returns to normal this weekend. Before the storm, dolphin were already being caught in depths from about 65 feet to the Gulf Stream. Trolling boats can also look for blackfin tuna and the occasional wahoo. Bottom fishing is excellent, especially on ledges from about 80 feet and deeper, led by vermilion snapper and black sea bass. Also expect to find grouper, triggerfish, porgy and amberjack. Red snapper cannot be harvested in the South Atlantic region and must be released. However, the 8-day 2014 recreational red snapper season in the South Atlantic is coming up soon, on July 11-13; July 18-20 and July 25-26.



Freshwater

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Look For

| Bream, catfish, bass, crappie



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Comments

| The rain from Hurricane Arthur, which fell only on the coastal plain and along the coast, should not cause a major rise in the rivers. In fact, the rain provided a benefit. “A rise in the water was needed, especially in areas like the Little Pee Dee that were so low they needed some water,” said Jamie Dunn of Fisherman’s Headquarters. “I think (the rain) will help (the fishing) out once the water settles down. It won’t take but a couple days for it to get back to normal.” Look for bream in 1-4 feet of water hitting crickets and worms, with the bigger fish found deeper. Bass are hitting best early and late. Catfish action is good on a variety of live and cut bait.



Gregg Holshouser

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