Letters to the Editor

Pernicious abortion justifications

Re May 21 letter by Daniel Zamos, “Abortion has been good for U.S.”

The Zamos letter exemplifies the pernicious and deceptive thought process promulgated by leftist and secular elements of our society to justify wrongful thought and ease their disturbed conscience. It is appalling for anyone who’s apparently reasonably intelligent to promulgate the idea that killing 1.4 to 1.5 million unborn children per year -- a number which equates to approximately 25 percent of the conceptions each year and are mainly eliminated for convenience not real health issues -- is a desirable means to lower the crime rate. This line of thought is barbaric and reminiscent of the massacre of the innocents promulgated by Herod the Great’s infanticide order after he learned of the birth of Christ.

The basis for the Zamos diatribe is a book by Stephen J. Dubner and Steven Levitt, “Freakonomics,” which attempts to meld pop culture with economics. The correlation between abortion and crime rate decline proposed in this book has been disputed:









John Lott in his book, “More Guns, Less Crime,” established that the overall crime rate dropped significantly twice, first after the Columbine shootings when there were calls for increased gun control causing gun purchases to increase significantly, then secondly after Obama’s election when again gun control was a topic of discussion and gun purchases increased.

It seems that the Zamos diatribe is based on disputed and probably flawed data and the likely cause for the crime rate drop is smarter criminals grew cautious each time citizens armed themselves.

In the last paragraph of his letter, Zamos tells us that although disadvantaged as a youth he was able to overcome this handicap by using opportunities available in the U.S. for those willing to expend the effort. It is unfortunate there’s no demonstrated compassion on his part that allows others a chance to follow the same or a similar path.

The writer lives in North Myrtle Beach.

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