Crime

Two charged with human trafficking. One of them had been in trouble before

Thirty-seven-year-old Julius La Rose Riley, left, and 20-year-old Kerry Andrell Lewis have been accused of human trafficking after a young girl, reported missing in North Carolina, was found advertised on a social media site.
Thirty-seven-year-old Julius La Rose Riley, left, and 20-year-old Kerry Andrell Lewis have been accused of human trafficking after a young girl, reported missing in North Carolina, was found advertised on a social media site.

One of two men accused of trafficking a young girl and forcing her to have sex for money in Myrtle Beach had trouble with the law prior to his arrest last week, according to online court records.

Thirty-seven-year-old Julius La Rose Riley of Homestead, Florida spent time in a federal prison for offenses at the nation’s largest military installation three years before he was arrested and accused of human trafficking on Friday.

Twenty-year-old Kerry Andrell Lewis of Fayetteville, North Carolina was taken into custody in Myrtle Beach on Thursday.

Lewis is charged with human trafficking and assigning prostitution after police say the family of a young girl, reported missing in North Carolina, saw a social media site advertising the girl for prostitution in Myrtle Beach. The girl has since been reunited with her family.

Lewis remained in custody of the J. Reuben Long Detention Center on Sunday under a total bond of $15,761.

Riley was charged with human trafficking and lying to police. His bonds were set at a total of $15,464. He bonded out of custody late Saturday afternoon, but online court records show this wasn’t his first arrest.

Riley was arrested in Florence County and accused of possessing a stolen pistol on April 30, 2010. The charge was dropped in court a little more than four months later.

On April 23, 2014, federal prosecutors say Riley was caught driving drunk on the Fort Bragg Military Reservation in Cumberland County, North Carolina. His blood alcohol concentration was listed at “0.08 percent or more” in federal court records.

Riley was charged with DWI, failure to maintain the limits of a lane of traffic and resisting an officer.

The case lumbered through the federal court system with two public defenders eventually leaving Riley’s defense before a third attorney was added to his case. Riley was found guilty on all three counts on Dec. 30, 2015 and was sentenced a week later to two days in federal prison and 12 months of probation, along with a substance abuse assessment and fines. He was ordered to surrender his North Carolina driver’s license, according to records.

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