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'Hot week ahead': How hot is it really going to get around Myrtle Beach this week?

Staying safe in hot temperatures

Some parts of the country are seeing dangerously high temperatures and as the mercury rises, so does the risk of heat-related illness. An emergency department doctor has tips on how to stay safe in the heat.
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Some parts of the country are seeing dangerously high temperatures and as the mercury rises, so does the risk of heat-related illness. An emergency department doctor has tips on how to stay safe in the heat.

It is going to get hot on the Grand Strand this week. The National Weather Service in Wilmington said folks should expect to feel triple-digit temperatures this week as the first day of summer starts on Thursday.

The heat index will be above 100 degrees through the week along the Grand Strand, according to the National Weather Service. Tuesday will bring an index of about 101 and it will climb to 106 on Wednesday, the weather service reported Monday.

Temperatures will be in the low 90s and high 80s this week, with lows in the high 70s, according to the NWS.

The California Emergency Management Agency visits the SPCA of Sacramento to learn how to spot unhealthy signs of heat stress in animals and how to keep them safe in the hot summer months.

There's a chance of showers and thunderstorms each day, said NWS forecaster Stephen Keebler.

"The chance of thunderstorms will increase toward the end of the week," Keebler said in a weekly forecast update.

A heat advisory could be issued on Tuesday and Wednesday, he said. "Heat safety rules and guidelines should be emphasized and followed," Keebler said.

The NWS warns about the health dangers of heat and said it's never safe to leave a toddler, disabled person or pet locked in a car.

Heat cramps can be the first sign of a heat-related illness, the NWS said.

If heavy sweating or painful muscle cramps and spasms start in the legs or abdomen, apply firm pressure on cramping muscles or gently massage the painful areas and sip water unless there are symptoms of nausea, the weather service reports.

Symptoms of heat exhaustion and a heat stroke are different, the NWS reports.

Heat exhaustion symptoms include heavy sweating, weakness, cool, pale and clammy skin, dizziness and fainting. Symptoms of a heat stroke are an altered mental state, a body temperature above 103 degrees, and a throbbing headache.

For more information about heat safety, visit https://www.weather.gov/safety/heat.

Hannah Strong: 843-444-1765, @HannahLStrong

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