Local

Officials: Hurricane Irma’s track shifted, but Carolinas should remain wary

Hurricane Irma holds steady crossing the Atlantic

Hurricane Irma is expected to strengthen to a Category 4 storm on Monday. The storm is still too far out for accurate prediction of where it will go. By midweek, it will be approaching the Lesser Antilles, likely to the northern edge, putting Anti
Up Next
Hurricane Irma is expected to strengthen to a Category 4 storm on Monday. The storm is still too far out for accurate prediction of where it will go. By midweek, it will be approaching the Lesser Antilles, likely to the northern edge, putting Anti

The threat of Hurricane Irma hitting the Carolinas is decreasing, however, the National Weather Service says the storm still “bears watching.”

A considerable shift south has changed the forecast for the storm, but there is still a chance that the path could change and head toward the Carolinas, Mark Bacon, a forecaster with NWS, said.

“It’s a little too early to write it off,” Bacon said.

Hurricane Irma is “expected to be a catastrophic major hurricane wherever it makes landfall,” a releases from NWS states.

The storm is now about 473 miles from the Leeward Islands and remains a category three hurricane. Winds have increased to 120 mph.

The Carolinas will see some effects from the storm beginning Tuesday, with increased rip current threats and bigger waves.

Weather throughout this week will remain seasonable through the next couple days. A cold front will bring rain as well as a cool down around midweek.

While the threat is still unclear, NWS suggests that the east coast prepare for a hurricane by stocking up on food and water, gas, having cash, ensuring that there is medicine and first-aid kits available, and that extra batteries are stocked for radios.

Megan Tomasic: 843-626-0343, @MeganTomasic

Related stories from Myrtle Beach Sun News

  Comments