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Fingers crossed to keep clouds and storms away from the Grand Strand during eclipse

The National Weather Service is predicting cloud cover across the country at the expected time of the full ecplise Monday.
The National Weather Service is predicting cloud cover across the country at the expected time of the full ecplise Monday. National Weather Service

Most of the Grand Strand can expect between a quarter and half an inch of rain Monday, according to the National Weather Service in Wilmington. But the question is exactly when those storms will move through as crowds are expected to descend on Georgetown and points south today to see the total eclipse.

The partial eclipse will begin at about 1:17 p.m. Monday in Georgetown, reaching totality at 2:46 p.m. All eyes will be on the sky with the hopes that any storms moving up the coast will roll through before or after the big show.

What is for certain in the Monday forecast from the NWS is that is will be hot and humid. The highs this afternoon from Georgetown to Myrtle Beach will be in the upper 80s and heat indexes around 97, according to the NWS.

The NWS Weather Prediction Center is updating its cloud cover forecasts nationwide every six hours Monday and most of the eclipse path across the United States looks relatively clear. As of early Monday morning, the NWS forecasts 60 to 70 percent total cloud cover for the area.

Testing your solar eclipse viewers and glasses is easy with a test you can do at home using indoor lights.

Charles Duncan: 843-626-0307, @duncanreporting

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