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Here’s where to get solar-viewing glasses for the total eclipse in August

In this Tuesday, July 18, 2017 photo, Twin Falls High School science teachers Ashley Moretti, left, and Candace Wright, right, use their eclipse shades to look at the sun as they pose for a portrait at Twin Falls High School in Twin Falls, Idaho. (Pat Sutphin/The Times-News via AP)
In this Tuesday, July 18, 2017 photo, Twin Falls High School science teachers Ashley Moretti, left, and Candace Wright, right, use their eclipse shades to look at the sun as they pose for a portrait at Twin Falls High School in Twin Falls, Idaho. (Pat Sutphin/The Times-News via AP) AP

On Aug. 21, select parts of America will get to see what could be a once-in-a-lifetime event for many: a total solar eclipse during which the moon will pass in front of the sun, casting a shadow on earth and temporarily turning day into night.

Myrtle Beach will experience a partial eclipse while everyone south of Murrells Inlet and North of Charleston will experience the total solar eclipse in its full glory.

An interactive NASA map found online details exactly where the total eclipse can be seen as well as the time the partial and total eclipses will begin.

Georgetown is the closest place near Myrtle Beach to view the total solar eclipse, which will begin about 30 seconds after 2:46 p.m. our time, and end about 20 seconds after 2:48 p.m. The partial eclipse will begin at 1:17 p.m. and end at 4:09 p.m.

But looking directly at the sun is bad for your eyes, even when wearing sunglasses. To avoid potential damage to your eyes, NASA has some guidelines to make sure you get the best glasses.

First, make sure it has a manufacture name and International Organization of Standardization reference number, also known as an ISO number. The ISO reference number should be 12312-2.

NASA also recommends using glasses with the manufacture label on it. Trusted manufacturers include American Paper Optics, Rainbow Symphony and Thousand Oaks Optical.

If the lenses have wrinkles or scratches on them, or if the glasses are more than three years old, they shouldn’t be used.

Another option for viewing the eclipse safely are solar viewers, which feature a rectangular lens that you hold up to your face.

The American Astronomical Association also published a list of manufacturers and retailers who offer eclipse viewing glasses and lenses. The entire list can be found here: https://eclipse.aas.org/resources/solar-filters.

Where can you find them?

Online: They can be ordered from Amazon or E-bay or other retailers suggested by the American Astronomical Association.

Georgetown: The city is giving away 2,000 eclipse glasses at three locations, limiting the supply to four pairs per household. The give-away will start August 17.

Georgetown Fire Department - 1405 Prince Street.

Georgetown Police Department - 2222 Highmarket Street.

City Hall - 1134 North Fraser Street.

Christian Boschult: 843-626-0218, @TSN_Christian

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