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Don’t forget those galoshes. We may get more rain than first predicted.

This graphic produced and provided by the National Weather Service office in Wilmington, N.C., shows Horry and Georgetown counties under a flash flood watch in effect through Tuesday morning.
This graphic produced and provided by the National Weather Service office in Wilmington, N.C., shows Horry and Georgetown counties under a flash flood watch in effect through Tuesday morning.

Forecasters are now predicting 5 to 7 inches of rain in parts of the region as a low-pressure system moves in with bloated clouds filled to the brim with rain and the chance of flooding.

A flash flood warning has been issued for Georgetown County until 2:15 p.m. and both Georgetown and Horry counties remain under a flash flood watch through 8 a.m. Tuesday.

Georgetown County Schools announced it would dismiss at 12:30 p.m. in light of the inclement weather. The county also opened an emergency shelter at Rosemary Middle School in Andrews at 10:30 a.m. after heavy rain led to flooding in parts of the county.

“Periods of heavy rain are expected during the day (Monday) and tonight as an area of low pressure moves across the Carolinas. As a result, the potential for flooding will be highest today and tonight,” said Steven Pfaff, a warning coordination meteorologist with the National Weather Service office in Wilmington, N.C. “Conditions will gradually improve during Tuesday as the areas of heavy rain become scattered.”

The primary threat from this system is flooding from heavy rainfall over short periods of time, he said.

“Vulnerable flood prone locations are at risk including low-lying and poor drainage areas. A few strong thunderstorms are also possible with some hail, isolated damaging straight-line wind gusts and an isolated tornado as secondary threats,” Pfaff said in his morning briefing.

A small craft advisory is in effect for coastal waters through Tuesday morning.

“Strong maritime winds are expected later today and tonight, especially across the offshore waters (beyond 20 nautical miles) where a gale warning is in effect,” Pfaff said. “Seas are expected to build to 10-13 feet offshore and up to 8 feet across the coastal waters.”

Forecasters predicted the potential of 3 to 6 inches of rain with the incoming weather system, but have since upped that prognostication to 5 to 7 inches of potential rainfall.

“Isolated higher amounts are possible,” Pfaff said in his briefing. “The bulk of the rainfall is expected today and tonight, but scattered storms will persist into Tuesday.”

Emily Weaver: 843-444-1722, @TSNEmily

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