Tourism

Portion of Surfside Beach pier deemed ‘structurally unsafe,’ scheduled for demolition

The Surfside Beach pier walkway remains empty and in disrepair following storm damage from Hurricane Matthew. Future repair and re-opening dates remain uncertain but the local landmark is not expected to be operational in time for the start of the 2018 season. June 9, 2017.
The Surfside Beach pier walkway remains empty and in disrepair following storm damage from Hurricane Matthew. Future repair and re-opening dates remain uncertain but the local landmark is not expected to be operational in time for the start of the 2018 season. June 9, 2017. jlee@thesunnews.com

A portion of the pier in Surfside Beach, deemed “structurally unsafe” months after it was ripped apart by Hurricane Matthew, will be coming down this week, according to our Grand Strand News Alliance partner, WPDE.

An engineer told city officials a few weeks ago that part of the pier was a safety hazard and needed to be removed, WPDE reported.

The town has hired MKT Trucking to remove 865 square feet of the pier, trimming it back about 36 feet at a cost of $7,440, according to WPDE. Work was set to begin Monday morning.

Rebuilding the pier has been delayed until 2019 and could take a year longer than than originally expected, according to WBTW.

The town is working with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the South Carolina Emergency Management Division and it’s own recovery team to restore the pier, according to a release from town officials last week.

Surfside Beach is working with Collins Engineers and Hagerty Consulting to provide FEMA “with an accurate and comprehensive damage assessment” in order to qualify for FEMA funding, the release stated.

The engineering firm is also working to identify feasible and cost-effective hazard mitigation measures “in order to rebuild the pier stronger and more resilient than before Hurricane Matthew,” Town Administrator Micki Fellner said in the release.

“We are moving as quickly as we can but this is a complicated project and since FEMA is involved it is critical that we do everything exactly as they require,” Fellner said. “Unfortunately, this means our hope of having it reopened by May of 2018 will likely not come to fruition.”

Check back for more on this developing story.

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