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MONDAYS-SATURDAYS | Through 09.01

Winyah Arts Association

The 25th annual Winyah Arts Association Multimedia Show continues through Sept. 1 in The Rice Museum’s Prevost Gallery.

The exhibition, open to artists from South Carolina and surrounding states, comprises two- and three-dimensional work, all of which is for sale. The show was judged by Scott Jacob, executive director of the Cultural Council of Georgetown County.

The museum, at 633 Front St., Georgetown, is open 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Mondays-Saturdays. Gallery admission is free.

To tour the museum, which includes a guided walk through the Old Market and Kaminski Hardware buildings, as well as access to the Old Market Building Clock Tower and the Maritime History Museum, home of the Browns Ferry Vessel, tickets are $7 for ages 22-59, $5 for ages 60 and older, $3 students ages 6-21, and free for ages 5 and younger.

Details at 546-7423 or www.ricemuseum.org.

DAILY | Through 10.28

National Sculpture Society

Brookgreen Gardens has opened a new exhibit as the sun sets on its annual “Cool Summer Nights” summer events.

The National Sculpture Society’s 79th annual Awards Exhibition, at its only venue for display, will continue through Oct. 28, a showcase to the New York-based organization founded in 1893. Visitors also can cast their vote in the People’s Choice Award, for which the winner will be announced at the show’s conclusion, and Brookgreen officials have tallied votes for every sculpture in this annual vote as well.

Also, the “Cool” nights promotion, for which the gardens stay open three nights a week every summer with special entertainment and family activities, will come to a close Friday with a final concert on the lawn 7-8:30 p.m. by the Pavilion Restaurant, with the Paul Grimshaw Band playing pop and rock tunes.

Guests on Tuesday also are welcome to the monthly horticulture program series, “Dirt ‘n’ Details,” on the second Tuesday of each month, next with “The Virtuous Honey Bee” noon-1 p.m. Tom Francis, beekeeper at Bees by the Sea Honeybee Services, will give a presentation.

All the aforementioned extras are free with admission, which lasts seven days: $14 ages 13-64, $12 ages 65 and older, and $7 ages 4-12.

Brookgreen, on U.S. 17, between Murrells Inlet and Litchfield Beach and across from Huntington Beach State Park, is open 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. daily.

Details at 235-6000, 800-849-1931 or www.brookgreen.org.

DAILY | For $2 extra

Big D at Broadway

Carmike Cinemas at Broadway at the Beach has added a 17th screen, but this one, its “Big D” theater, stands three stories tall, with enhanced, digital surround sound and 3-D viewing.

In the former Imax 3-D Theatre, and a short walk from the main, 16-screen complex, the hottest movie that week will play, a Carmike official said. Big D debuted at midnight Aug. 2 last Thursday night with the remake of “Total Recall,” a science fiction thriller first released in 1990 with a cast including Arnold Schwarzenegger, Sharon Stone and Rachel Ticotin.

Prices are $2 more than standard ticket prices, so a matinee that costs $5.50 or $6.50, would be $7.50 or $8.50, respectively in Big D, and an $8.50 regular evening price in the main theater, would be $10.50 for Big D.

Details at 445-1600, 445-1616, www.carmike.com or www.fandango.com.

SATURDAY | 08.11

‘Spies, Signals and Secrets’

Wrapping up its 2012 “Second Saturdays” series, the Fort Fisher State Historic Site will present “Spies, Signals, and Secrets: Civil War Communication and Fort Fisher” 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday at the site near Kure Beach and the N.C. Aquarium at Fort Fisher.

The event will include several hands-on activities such as learning the signal flag alphabet and creating and using cipher disks to communicate. A “secret” speaker will discuss the story of Rose O’Neal Greenhow, an unlikely Confederate spy known as “Wild Rose.”

Costumed tours of the fort’s remaining earthworks will be given throughout the day. The program is free, although donations are appreciated.

The fort had fallen to Union forces on Jan. 15, 1865, which closed Wilmington’s port, a Confederate lifeline, to foreign trade.

Find the fort on 1610 Fort Fisher Blvd S., Kure Beach.

Details at 910-458-5538 or www.nchistoricsites.org/fisher/.

The fort and aquarium (910-458-7468 or ncaquariums.com/fort-fisher) also are accessible through the Southport-Fort Fisher Ferry, where the crossing takes about 35 minutes and the fare rates include a standard car and riders for $5 one way. Details at 800-293-3779 or www.ncdot.gov/download/transit/ferry/ferryschedule.pdf.

TUESDAY | 08.14

Blues photo documentary

The Coastal Carolina Camera Club will present a photographic documentary program by Armon Means and Easton Selby, assistant professors of photography from the visual arts department at Coastal Carolina University in Conway.

This photo essay will cover people who, and places that, have inspired the music and culture of American blues. The program shares the interpretations of three photographers who traveled the area where the musicians worked and lived, and interviews with individuals who inspired the music. The presentation also will show photography’s key role in the documentation of the music, place and people.

Meet at 7 p.m. at Shallotte Presbyterian Church, 5070 Main St., Shallotte, N.C., where the club convenes on the second Tuesday monthly. Membership is open to photographers of all skill levels using film or digital cameras, and guests are always welcome.

Details at 287-6311 or www.coastalcarolinacameraclub.org.

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