In this Jan. 16, 2019, photo, Park I Seul speaks during an interview in Seoul, South Korea. As she pursued her dream of becoming a fashion model, Park realized she was neither tall or skinny, like typical runway models, nor “big enough” to be a plus-size model. She also realized one day that the only way to meet the lofty ideals of South Korea’s beauty standards was for her to continuously deny herself. Her newfound view of her body is part of a growing movement by South Korean women who have begun to resist what they see as extreme pressure to look a certain way.
In this Jan. 16, 2019, photo, Park I Seul speaks during an interview in Seoul, South Korea. As she pursued her dream of becoming a fashion model, Park realized she was neither tall or skinny, like typical runway models, nor “big enough” to be a plus-size model. She also realized one day that the only way to meet the lofty ideals of South Korea’s beauty standards was for her to continuously deny herself. Her newfound view of her body is part of a growing movement by South Korean women who have begun to resist what they see as extreme pressure to look a certain way. Jung Yoon Kim AP Photo
In this Jan. 16, 2019, photo, Park I Seul speaks during an interview in Seoul, South Korea. As she pursued her dream of becoming a fashion model, Park realized she was neither tall or skinny, like typical runway models, nor “big enough” to be a plus-size model. She also realized one day that the only way to meet the lofty ideals of South Korea’s beauty standards was for her to continuously deny herself. Her newfound view of her body is part of a growing movement by South Korean women who have begun to resist what they see as extreme pressure to look a certain way. Jung Yoon Kim AP Photo