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  • Murrells Inlet "Snakeman" follows in families footsteps

    Franklin Smalls, known as the “Snakeman” to locals, has been picking oysters from the pluff mud of Murrells Inlet for 58 years, often singing as he works. At 67-years-old, Smalls says he followed in his father’s and grandfather’s muddy footprints when he was 9-years-old.

Franklin Smalls, known as the “Snakeman” to locals, has been picking oysters from the pluff mud of Murrells Inlet for 58 years, often singing as he works. At 67-years-old, Smalls says he followed in his father’s and grandfather’s muddy footprints when he was 9-years-old. James Lee jlee@thesunnews.com
Franklin Smalls, known as the “Snakeman” to locals, has been picking oysters from the pluff mud of Murrells Inlet for 58 years, often singing as he works. At 67-years-old, Smalls says he followed in his father’s and grandfather’s muddy footprints when he was 9-years-old. James Lee jlee@thesunnews.com

“We’ve got everything a poor person wants, right here:” Murrells Inlet ‘Snakeman’ follows family tradition of picking oysters

March 29, 2017 05:22 PM

UPDATED March 29, 2017 08:46 PM

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  • How Carolina Forest could become a city

    Carolina Forest could incorporate into its own city with a petition to South Carolina and a referendum.