Cantor Moshe Taube poses for a portrait at his home in Pittsburgh's Squirrel Hill neighborhood on Friday, July 14, 2017. He is long past retirement as one of his generation’s most renowned cantors, a living link to Eastern European Jewish culture before it was devastated in the Holocaust that claimed much of his family. Yet Moshe Taube still can fill a living room or a synagogue or a concert hall with his rich, fluid, reverberating voice, conveying a sense of trembling before the divine.
Cantor Moshe Taube poses for a portrait at his home in Pittsburgh's Squirrel Hill neighborhood on Friday, July 14, 2017. He is long past retirement as one of his generation’s most renowned cantors, a living link to Eastern European Jewish culture before it was devastated in the Holocaust that claimed much of his family. Yet Moshe Taube still can fill a living room or a synagogue or a concert hall with his rich, fluid, reverberating voice, conveying a sense of trembling before the divine. Pittsburgh Post-Gazette via AP Andrew Rush
Cantor Moshe Taube poses for a portrait at his home in Pittsburgh's Squirrel Hill neighborhood on Friday, July 14, 2017. He is long past retirement as one of his generation’s most renowned cantors, a living link to Eastern European Jewish culture before it was devastated in the Holocaust that claimed much of his family. Yet Moshe Taube still can fill a living room or a synagogue or a concert hall with his rich, fluid, reverberating voice, conveying a sense of trembling before the divine. Pittsburgh Post-Gazette via AP Andrew Rush

Pennsylvania cantor, once on Schindler's List, sings on

August 12, 2017 3:04 AM