Joe Sinnott (right), who has spent decades as a comic book artist and spends winters near Murrells Inlet, meets up with Stan Lee at the Rhode Island Comic Con in November. Lee first employed Sinnott in the 1950s at what later became Marvel Comics, and Sinnott continues inking the Sunday strips for “Spider-Man,” as drawn by Bob Wiacek, which newspapers publish nationwide through King Features.
Joe Sinnott (right), who has spent decades as a comic book artist and spends winters near Murrells Inlet, meets up with Stan Lee at the Rhode Island Comic Con in November. Lee first employed Sinnott in the 1950s at what later became Marvel Comics, and Sinnott continues inking the Sunday strips for “Spider-Man,” as drawn by Bob Wiacek, which newspapers publish nationwide through King Features. Courtesy photo
Joe Sinnott (right), who has spent decades as a comic book artist and spends winters near Murrells Inlet, meets up with Stan Lee at the Rhode Island Comic Con in November. Lee first employed Sinnott in the 1950s at what later became Marvel Comics, and Sinnott continues inking the Sunday strips for “Spider-Man,” as drawn by Bob Wiacek, which newspapers publish nationwide through King Features. Courtesy photo

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Comic book characters turn new pages in culture, cinema

February 16, 2017 5:00 AM

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