Issac Bailey blog | Why I love South Carolina: Politics that involve a reality TV star-drug felon who must be taken seriously

Posted on July 16, 2014 

Here’s why South Carolina is special:

The state’s senior U.S. Senator, Lindsey Graham, is being challenged by a convicted drug dealer, turned reality TV star who happens to be the son of the man who called the NAACP the “National Association of Retarded People” and has the longest cable-stayed bridge in North America named after him.

That challenger is an on-the-record supporter of Rep. Mark Sanford, a governor who ended his second term in office walking an imaginary Appalachian Trail to a mistress he dodged the state police and lied to his own advisers to go see then won a seat back in Congress by convincing a deep-red district in a deep-red state in the Bible Belt to forgive his transgressions – or to at least remember that for all the wrong he’d done, he was still no Democrat!

Oh, that challenger, Thomas Ravenel, a Republican running as an independent, is being taken so seriously that the state’s GOP has taken to ripping him publicly. And he admits that he, as a white man in a state whose prison population is mostly dark-skinned, was fortunate to have benefited from a racist drug war that would have seen a black man selling crack instead of powder cocaine serve more than the 10 months in prison like he did.

What’s more, had the state’s Democratic Party been able to nominate someone anyone in South Carolina had ever heard of, Ravenel’s candidacy would serve as a viable threat to Graham.

Alas, this is South Carolina where Democrats, who once ruled politics, are now taken less seriously for national office than your average drug dealer. Come November Graham, the Republican, will win – but not before my native state has a little fun with the latest clown car entry in our never-ending political circus.

Read more about Ravenel here.

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