Business Pulse for the Myrtle Beach area: May 3

May 3, 2014 

ARRIVALS

•  Harry C. Hales has joined Anderson Brothers Bank as collection manager.

•  Greg Daubehas, senior auto glass technician, has joined Glasspro.

AWARDS

• Several local companies received awards from The Printing Industry of the Carolinas: Sheriar Press of Myrtle Beach won 24 “Best of Category,” 20 “Special Judges,” nine “Awards of Excellence” and the “Case Paper Award for Best Brochure” and the “Gutenberg Award for the Most Best of Category Winners;” The Printing Port won one “Best of Category” and one “Award of Excellence;” Duplicates INK of Conway won four “Best of Category” and one “Special Judges Award;” Horry Georgetown Technical College won one “Special Judges Award.”

• Grand Strand Medical Center received the “Get With the Guidelines – Stroke Bronze Quality Achievement” award and “Silver-Plus Quality Achievement” award for implementing specific measures outlined by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

• The Brandon Agency has been recognized with a Silver Wing Award at the S.C. Public Relations Society of America’s annual Mercury Awards event, for the agency’s 2013 media relations campaign for the Beaufort Regional Chamber of Commerce.

•  Elbert Dorn, a Nexsen Pruet attorney in Myrtle Beach, has been listed in the 2014 edition of South Carolina Super Lawyers.

• Waccamaw Community Hospital has earned the South Carolina Hospital Association’s Certified Zero Harm Award.

Get your item in Business Pulse by emailing it to businesspulse@thesunnews.com.

Myrtle Beach Sun News is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

Commenting FAQs | Terms of Service