Myrtle Beach man charged in purse snatching outside bar

troot@thesunnews.comJanuary 20, 2014 

Jonathan Clair Warner

A 30-year-old Myrtle Beach man was jailed during the weekend on a purse snatching charge after an incident outside a bar, according to authorities.

Jonathan Clair Warner, 30, of Myrtle Beach was charged with purse snatching and was being held at 7:30 a.m. Monday pending a bond hearing, according to Myrtle Beach Jail records.

Warner was taken into custody after officers were called about 9:30 p.m. Saturday to 7710 N. Kings Highway for a strong armed robbery, police said. Officers learned the victim, a 32-year-old man but who is referred to as a woman, had her cellphone and cigarettes stolen after an altercation with Warner.

The victim said she met Warner at the bar and briefly spoke to him, according to the report. The victim said later in the evening as she left the bar, she saw Warner outside with his head down.

The victim said she asked if Warner was ok and wanted company, but he said no and then took her wallet, cellphone and cigarettes, according to the report. The victim said she grabbed her wallet back and Warner punched her in the face several times.

The victim said she also punched Warner and he let go of the wallet and ran away with her cellphone and cigarettes, according to the report. While officers were at the scene, they learned Warner was in the area and he returned to the parking lot where he was taken into custody and identified in the incident.

Contact TONYA ROOT at 444-1723 or follow her at Twitter.com/tonyaroot.

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