Law

Letter | Prosecutors botched Zimmerman case

July 19, 2013 

Alan Dershowitz, Harvard Law professor, stated during a recent interview that if there is to be a civil rights investigation, the targets should be the prosecutors for violating George Zimmerman's civil rights. He alleges that special prosecutor Angela Corey initially withheld photos and other evidence from the defense and the judge that were clearly exculpatory, such as the photos of Zimmerman bleeding from the nose and of his head lacerations.

If you all remember, the local police and prosecutor declined to bring charges against Zimmerman for what they believed was a lack of evidence. The chief of police was fired, the local prosecutor removed from the case and Corey was appointed special prosecutor by the governor.

Did she present the case to a grand jury, which is standard for homicide cases? Of course not. Why? Because she knew the case was weak and a grand jury might return a no bill, especially on a murder II charge. That would be a disaster. Then her team proceeded to investigate by interviewing Martin's mother in the mayor's office and another key witness in Martin's mother’s home, while she was sitting there. Investigations 101 anyone?

Meanwhile, NBC was busy doctoring Zimmerman's call to the police dispatcher, the rest of the media were releasing photos of Martin when he was 12 years old, the president was making statements such as if he had a son, he would look like Trayvon and the Department of Justice, according to Judicial Watch, sent a team to Florida to help “keep the peace” by assisting in the organization of anti-Zimmerman protests.

Heck, what's wrong with that? The DOJ does not even deny that this occurred. Meanwhile, Jesses and Als of the world were in full race-baiting form even after the FBI conducted a preliminary civil rights investigation and found no evidence of racial bias in this case.

Then in the 11th hour, the prosecution figured that their case was going south so they needed to include some lesser included offenses such as manslaughter and murder III, with the child abuse kicker. The judge did not go for the child abuse angle but agreed to the manslaughter instruction. This is akin to extending the game to 10 innings to give the losing team a better chance to win.

They also were hoping that the six women on the jury, five of whom are mothers, might find for manslaughter out of sympathy for Martin's mother, not knowing that the sentence exposure for manslaughter with a firearm is almost as severe as murder II. Fortunately, the jurors in this case did their job, carefully reviewed the evidence and the judge's instructions and came to a decision based on the facts in evidence with no consideration to the all the lies, deceit and sleight of hand that went on during this fiasco.

The writer lives in Murrells Inlet.

Myrtle Beach Sun News is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

Commenting FAQs | Terms of Service