Prosecution

Letter | Zimmerman will face ultimate judgment

July 19, 2013 

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With all the rainy humid weather over the past month, I watched almost all of the Florida vs Zimmerman trial. There wasn't much evidence of what actually happened in the two crucial minutes before George Zimmerman shot and killed the unarmed Trayvon Martin, and despite a flawed prosecution and the Florida “Stand your Ground” statute, I would have voted Guilty of Manslaughter, and here's why:

Zimmerman's only defense was that he fired in self defense in fear of his life or significant bodily harm. Despite two minutes of supposed fighting, there was little evidence of any serious injury.

I am convinced that most of the fight, after the punch in the nose and the fall to the ground, consisted of Martin on top of Zimmerman who repeatedly cried for help. Maybe Martin was punching or slapping him, but there is no evidence of that.

Zimmerman knew that the police were on the way. Why could he have not continued wrestling with Martin until they arrived? Why didn't he say, “Hey, I'm the neighborhood watch guy.” Maybe he did, because somehow after being totally subdued by Martin, he managed to get his gun out.

Based on these facts, it appeared to me that Martin would have backed off once he saw the gun. If not, why not fire a warning shot? It would be very loud and shock Martin.

He simply had no cause to aim the gun at Martin's heart and pull the trigger. Martin had no weapon, not even a knife. There is no case for self defense here. This is classic manslaughter. For the life of me, I don't know why the prosecution didn't make this argument to the jury.

A juror told CNN that Zimmerman showed bad judgment by getting out of his car. He showed worse judgment by killing Martin. He may have escaped justice here, but he will have a very difficult guilt ridden life ahead of him.

The writer lives in Myrtle Beach.

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